halloween confetti

In the spirit of Halloween this month, let’s take a break from scary estate planning excuses, probate fees, and haunting nonprofit actions and have some fun. Whether you’re an attorney, work with the law in other ways, or are just a fan of legal puns, these last-minute Halloween costumes are for you!

Exhibit A

This costume goes in the “oh shoot I just got invited to a Halloween party tonight” category. Be an evidence exhibit by simply donning a white shirt, and pinning a piece of red paper with “Exhibit A” in large black letters on it! It’s old-school (pre-Internet filing days) and excessively easy.

https://www.gordonfischerlawfirm.com/nonprofit-scariest-things/ Law-suit  

Similar to the exhibit A costume, you can totally fashion this more formal look out of a suit you already have. Wear a suit, write the word “law” on a piece of paper and hang it around your neck. Get it? Law-suit! Word of caution: you may get eye rolls, smiles, and chuckles at your look.

A salt & battery 

In need of a couples costume? Take on a couple of classic tort claims of assault and battery that are often paired together. Throw together a salt shaker look by wearing a white shirt with a black “s” on the front and a tin foil hat. Pair it with your crafty partner who can create something that looks like a battery and voila!

halloween on chalkboard

Voir deer

Animals tend to be a safe pick for adult Halloween costumes, but this one puts a legal spin on a deer costume. Assemble an assortment of brown clothing and get some cute ears that make you look like a woodland deer. Have a friend write the word “voir” on your forehead. Boom. You’re voir dire! You’ll have a great time explaining jury selection to everyone who is confused by your choice of apparel.

What law-related Halloween costumes have you imagined? Share them in the comments with GFLF on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

register to vote early

Estate planning, nonprofit formation, and charitable giving are extremely important, but guess what else is something worth writing about? Voting! Casting a ballot may seem like a small action, but collectively our votes can make a big impact.

Tomorrow, September 24, is National Voter Registration Day. The unofficial national “holiday” was first recognized in 2012. It’s a non-partisan event and all about rallying people to register as voters and encourage Americans to make their voices heard. It’s a great day to set aside politics and ideological differences in the name of democracy through fostering civic unity.

Indeed, every year lots of people find out they are unable to cast a vote in an election because they missed the registration deadline, failed to update their registration, or weren’t sure how to register in the first place.

Voting laws and regulations vary from state to state, so I recommend checking in on this website (Vote 411) for your particular state regarding the details for where you live.

a non-partisan event and all about rallying people to register as voters and to make their voices heard. It's a great day to set aside politics and ideological differences in the name of democracy through fostering civic unity. 

General Voting Registration Information for Iowa

Here is some specific information regarding voter registration in Iowa:

  • You may register in person at the polls on Election Day, but you have to make certain to bring the correct voter ID. (But, if you register in advance it will expedite your Voting Day experience.)
  • You can opt to mail in the form, but if you go with this option, the form must be received by election officials at least 10 days before primary and general elections, and 11 days before all other elections. If you mail your registration application, it must be postmarked 15 days before the election or received by either 10 or 11 days before the election, depending on the type of election.
  • Good news: registration is permanent. After you register, you do not have to register again unless you move!

ID Needed for Voter Registration (in Advance of Election Day) in Iowa

To register to vote in Iowa, you must provide an Iowa driver’s license number or a social security number.  That said, there is a box to check on the voter registration form if you have neither of those numbers.

ID Needed for Voter Registration (on Election Day) in Iowa

If you choose to register for the first time on Election Day at the polls, or after a recent move to Iowa, you must prove both who you are and where you live. You can use any of these forms of ID as long as they are current, valid, and contain an expiration date:

  • Iowa drivers license
  • Iowa non-driver ID card
  • Out-of-state driver’s license or non-driver ID card
  • US passport
  • US military ID
  • ID card issued by employer
  • Student ID issued by Iowa high school or college
  • Tribal ID

If your photo ID does not contain your current address, you can use another document to prove where you live. The following options are deemed acceptable proof of residence as long as they contain your name, current address, and are current within 45 days:

  • Residential lease
  • Utility bill (including a cell phone bill)
  • Bank statement
  • Paycheck
  • Government check or other government documents

If you don’t have any of the documents at the polling place and are asked for ID, if you have another voter who knows you and is registered in the same precinct they can vouch for your ID and residence.

The final option when registering at a polling place and you don’t have the necessary ID or someone to vouch for you, you can cast a provisional ballot.

Think you may be Registered to Vote Already?

Not sure if you’re already registered to vote? This online tool from Vote 411 can be a useful starting point. If you live in Iowa, use the Iowa Secretary of State’s website to search the database.

When are Upcoming Elections in Iowa?

It’s not just the presidential election you should vote it! Voter registration enables you to vote in local and state elections that can have a much more direct effect on your specific community. It also enables you to participate in the always exciting Iowa Caucuses. Check out this page for upcoming elections in your state. (Select your state and election date and hit apply.)

Let me know if you have any questions and I’m happy to connect you with resources and information! My email is gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com and my phone number is 515-371-6077. 

 

We the people close up

We’re headed “back to school” on the blog this month, and I couldn’t pass up today’s fantastic excuse for a short American history lesson!

Fourth of July gets all the attention for red, white, and blue pride, but Constitution Day is a lesser-known, but still important reason to celebrate America’s values of freedom, democracy, and liberty. Constitution Day commemorates the formation and signing of the U.S. Constitution on September 17, 1787. The Constitution was signed in Pennsylvania at the Constitutional Convention by 39 men including Alexander Hamilton, Benjamin Franklin, James Madison, and George Washington.

Mount Rushmore

There’s a wealth of American history I encourage you to explore to understand in full the lead-up of events that led to the execution of the Constitution. TIME wrote a great piece and the National Archives offers up some great information.

Constitution Day also stands to recognize everyone who has become an American citizen. According to USCIS, more than 260 naturalization ceremonies were held across the nation as part of this year’s Constitution Week. In fact, before 2004, the day was called Citizenship Day.

Statute of Liberty

For me, the Constitution represents one of the most important legal foundations, on which the world’s oldest constitutional republic is built. That said, we must never forget the privilege it grants us and the duty we all have as citizens to protect it through civic engagement and knowledge. What does Constitution Day mean to you?

“The strength of the Constitution lies entirely in the determination of each citizen to defend it. Only if every single citizen feels duty bound to do his share in this defense are the constitutional rights secure.”
― Albert Einstein

While it’s not the U.S. Constitution, your estate plan is similar in the way that it’s a guiding document that guides people in the future as to your goals and intentions for your property, body, charitable giving, and what you want to happen with the people and pets you care for. So, you can think of yourself as a “founding father” of the legacy you want to leave. Ready to put your “John Hancock” on an estate plan? Get started with my free Estate Plan Questionnaire or contact me.

red poppies memorial day

I want to take this moment on Memorial Day to express my deep gratitude for the fallen heroes and military veterans who have served America. Indeed, we can enjoy the land of free only because of these brave individuals.

While Memorial Day is the unofficial start to the summer season, ushering in the much awaited season with a long weekend of sunshine and BBQs. A Monday off of work is always a cause for celebration, but throughout all this we must not forget the true meaning of this important day—to praise, to thank, and to remember.

GFLF has worked with many veterans on estate planning and in nonprofit formation/compliance, and it’s always an honor. There are not enough “thank yous” in the world to express our gratitude for what the veterans (and their families) have done for our country. I would also like to extend this sentiment to first responders who have served on the front lines of protecting the public including police, firefighters, and EMS personnel. A special and sincere thanks to those who have sacrificed in the line of danger and their families.

man with army parachute

As modern-day heroes, our veterans and first responders’ stories are important. Their legacy is important. To preserve that tradition of strength and service, you need an estate plan to ensure your property and assets are distributed to your loved ones, and favorite charities in accordance with your wishes.

So, in an attempt to express my gratitude, I would like to offer 25% off the cost of an estate plan package to all Iowan active duty or retired service members and first responders. The rate also extends to spouses. The discount will be available through 6/30/2019. Contact me via email or by phone (515-371-6077) to lock in the rate and discuss your estate plan needs.

Veterans Day flags

What Does an Estate Plan Include?

There are six documents that should be part of most everyone’s estate plan.

  1. Estate planning questionnaire
  2. Will
  3. Power of attorney for health care
  4. Power of attorney for finances
  5. Disposition of personal property
  6. Disposition of final remains

You should keep these documents updated and current. (Here are a few common “big” events that may necessitate estate plan revisions.) Also, don’t forget about assets with your beneficiary designations. For most Iowans, that’s good enough—six documents, keeping them current, and also remembering about those assets with beneficiary designations.

Special Estate Planning Consideration for Veterans

It’s super important that military veterans work with an attorney that specializes in estate planning as veterans have some unique assets and situations to consider. This can make the estate plan more complex and there can be unintended serious legal consequences if your plan is not drafted properly. A few examples of inputs to consider for veterans involve:

  • Retirement benefit pay (considered guaranteed income)
  • Survivor Benefit Plan (if so elected)
  • Pension benefits
  • Life insurance
  • Dependent Indemnity Coverage (if applicable)

Cost of an Estate Plan

Because I want every Iowan to have an up-to-date estate plan I’m very transparent with the cost of an estate plan that that takes into full consideration YOUR situation. (This is why you need an experienced estate planner to draft your documents.) With the Memorial Day estate plan discount, that translates into significant savings.

Estate Planning Process

I write about my process at length, but it’s just five steps! Seriously, it’s not that painful. My clients report back to me that they have such relief and peace of mind when it’s completed.

DISCLAIMERS

The “Memorial Day discount” is only applicable for estate plans created by active or retired veterans and first responders (and their spouses). Availability of the discount ends after June 30, 2019 at which point the prospective client must have contacted Gordon Fischer Law Firm and indicated an intention to make an estate plan.
Memorial Day discount merely relates to pricing and in no way creates an attorney-client relationship, nor any other kind of professional relationship. The Memorial Day discount does not create a contract or agreement of any kind.
Gordon Fischer Law Firm, P.C. retains full and total discretion as to who it chooses to serve as clients and why. Gordon Fischer Law Firm, P.C. retains the right to refuse service to anyone it so chooses.
The Memorial Day discount may not apply to individuals or families with a net worth of more than $1 million dollars. (High net worth families definitely need an estate plan, very much so, but the applied strategies and tools will be more complicated.)
Selection Sunday 2017

1. If you understand #SelectionSunday, and #MarchMadness, you can most certainly understand estate planning.

When I meet people who say they’re confused about estate planning I love to see their faces when I tell them understanding the basics of wills, trusts, and even business succession planning may sound intimidating, but the basics are as simple as understanding NCAA March Madness. Seriously! Many folks know what teams are on the bubble, which teams were playing well at end of the season and which weren’t, what the most likely upsets are, and so on.NCAA Basketballs

Just like all those details are a part of #SelectionSunday and #NCAAMarchMadness, there are multiple inputs that go into a quality estate plan. For starters, there are your personal goals, the six main estate planning documents, and then personal considerations for, say, children, a family with special needs, pets, and charitable bequests. Feel free to read into these estate plan elements (like you would check out the stats of your favorite teams!) in between sweating out your bracket. And, speaking of your bracket…

2. If you have time to fill out a March Madness bracket (and you do), you also have time to fill out an Estate Plan Questionnaire.

Most everyone I know fills out a March Madness bracket in a (mostly) friendly competition with family, friends, co-workers, or sometimes all three. If you have time to fill out a bracket, why not also put serious thought into securing your future with estate planning? No, I’m not trying to guilt you. It’s just, again, it’s not that hard! You can find my Estate Plan Questionnaire here. It’s a great place to start.

 3. Weird stuff happens.

We all know that a huge part of the fun of NCAA March Madness is the upsets. The super thrilling and/or gut-wrenching endings that shouldn’t have happened, but somehow did. It’s a reminder that life, for better or worse, is quite unpredictable. Why not make sure that plans are in place in case something unexpected happens?

Want some more sports to legal analogies in your life? Check out this read on preparing your favorite nonprofit for top-notch compliance.

Regardless of who you’re slating to win it all, I would love to hear from you; let’s schedule an initial free one-hour consultation (at no obligation, of course). Email me at gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com or give me a call at 515-371-6077.

cutting into a pie

Pi (π) is the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter. Pi is a constant number, meaning that for all circles of any size, Pi will be the same. (It’s also a great day to deliver pie to Gordon Fischer Law Firm…any kind will do!)

Like geometry, in estate planning there are many variables, and some constants, too. Ironically, one of the constants in estate planning is change. And as your life and circumstances changes, your estate plan needs to change too.

Change & Your Estate Plan

Let’s assume you’ve gone to an estate planning lawyer, and you have (at the very least) the six “must have” estate planning documents. That’s great, well done. (You can read all about these six documents here.).

But remember you also need to keep these documents updated and current.

Major Life Events

If you undergo a major life event, you may well want to (re)visit with your estate planning lawyer, to see if this life event requires changing your estate plan through different provisions, tools, and strategies.

What do I mean by a major life event? Some common such events include:

  • The birth or adoption of a child or grandchild
  • Marriage or divorce
  • Illness or disability of a spouse or beneficiary
  • Purchasing a home or other large asset
  • Moving to another state
  • Large increases or decreases in the value of assets, such as investments
  • If you or your spouse receives a large inheritance or gift
  • If any family member or other heir dies, becomes ill, or becomes disabled
  • Launch or closure of a business

This is just a short list of life events that should cause you to reconsider your estate plan; there are many others.

Changes in goals

It’s not just life changes, though. It may be that your overall goals for your estate plan have changed over time. You may want to change the amounts of inheritances. As your financial situation changes, you may want to increase or decrease, your charitable bequests.

Laws are dynamic and changing

And, it’s not just changes in your own life you need to think about, either. Congress, the Iowa legislature, and the courts are constantly changing the laws. When the rules change, so too must your estate plan.

Meet the Donor Family

To illustrate when estate plans should be updated, let’s look at the Donor Family. Jill and Dave have been married for 25 years and have four grown children. They executed a common-sense estate plan a few years ago.

Since that time, the Donors have gone through many changes, as you would expect, and as all families have. Should Jill and Dave update their estate plan to reflect changes in their family’s circumstance? Consider the following:

Divorce

One of the Donor kids filed for a divorce from his wife. Jim and Carol need to update their estate plan since they decided they now want to exclude the ex-spouse as a beneficiary.

Changes in financial status

Jill’s uncle passed away and left her a great deal of money. The Donors need to determine how this inheritance will affect their current plan and future estate tax liability. The Donors may want to be more generous to their favorite charities. They may want to talk to their estate planning lawyer about charitable giving through a planned gift, such as a charitable gift annuity or charitable remainder trust.

Birth

Our example couple’s youngest child recently announced that she and her spouse are expecting their first child. Jill and Dave must update their estate plan to provide for the new grandchild.

Major changes in health

The Donor’s youngest child was in a serious car accident, which resulted in severe disability. He can no longer work and is receiving government disability benefits. The Donors will want to seriously consider setting up a special needs trust. This type of trust will allow a beneficiary to receive inheritances, without it being considered income by the government for qualification purposes.

New real estate outside Iowa

Jill and Dave recently bought a vacation home in Arizona. The vacation home may well be affected by Arizona laws. In any case, the Donors’ estate plan should reflect this new asset.

vw bus in arizona

As you can see the Donor Family has many reasons to revisit their estate plan, and more than likely, so do you! In between bites of your favorite pie, review your current estate plan to make sure its current. (If you still need an estate plan, the best place to start is with my Estate Plan Questionnaire.) Additionally, I can always be found at gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com and 515-371-6077.

Pop the popcorn, uncork the champagne, and put on your best red-carpet duds to tune into the 91st Academy Awards tonight! In between award envelopes and amazing performances, consider how your 2019 Oscar ballot has some surprising connections with estate planning. It may sound like a stretch, but hear me out while you watch the pre-show coverage.

Anything Could Happen

If you’re a film buff who has managed to watch all nine of the Best Picture category nominees (first off, I’m jealous), you may have a strong opinion about which one deserves to win. However, just like life, anything could happen! You may bet that Green Book most certainly will be victorious, but in the end, Bohemian Rhapsody ends up taking home the gold with the power of a Freddie Mercury vocal high note. You know one of the films will win, just like you know someday you’re going to pass away. However, you cannot know which one of the films will win ahead of time, just like you cannot know how and when your final scene will be.

Expecting the unexpected is what estate planning boils down to. With something fun and entertaining like the Academy Awards, surprises can make for ready Oscar party fodder. But, when it comes to your estate—all of your assets you worked hard to acquire—surprises can make for frustration and confusionin fighting for your family, extended probate time and fees, and assets being distributed in a way that you wouldn’t have chosen.

Estate planning allows you to make certain your loved ones and the charities you care most about “win,” regardless of when you pass away.

It’s All in the Family

Some of the films nominated this year have familial relationships as a central plot device in the scripts. For instance, the household highlighted in Roma includes four children who the maid (brilliantly played by Yalitza Aparicio) cares for.

People are considered minor children until they turn 18, and parents should have guardianship defined through their estate plans. That way, if something were to happen to the minor’s legal guardian(s), they could be immediately placed under the care of another trusted adult. Unless guardianship has been established, the Iowa Courts must choose guardians for the minor child if the legal guardian died or was incapacitated. Unfortunately, with no clear choice as to what the former caregivers would have preferred, the Court must basically make its own and best determination as to who the parents would have preferred and what would be in the best interest of the children. The Court may or may not, choose who the former caregivers would have named.

Leave a Lasting Legacy

Some of the greatest films of all time have won the “Best Picture” category and left a cinematic legacy that has lasted well beyond their premiere date. These movies and the stories they tell live on in infamy, as generation after generation experiences their contribution to the entertainment industry. Indeed, the plot of nominee Black Panther is largely rooted around how Prince T’Challa will continue his father’s legacy and protect the wealth and assets of Wakanda.

Perhaps one or more of the 2019 Best Picture nominees will join this upper echelon of cinema (and maybe not), but estate planning also allows you to also make a mark on your world—a chance to leave a lasting legacy. A legacy can be interpreted differently by different people. A legacy to you could mean leaving a sizable charitable bequest to your church or alma mater. It could also mean bequeathing your art collection to your favorite museum. It could mean establishing college funds for all of your children and grandchildren to represent your belief in continuous learning. Whatever you envision your legacy to be, an estate plan will allow you to shape it…think of it as your own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame!

hollywood walk of fame star

Retain Your Control

Power is a common theme in some of the films nominated this year. Whether it’s ladies-in-waiting fighting to be Queen Anne’s “chosen one” in The Favourite, or Dick Cheney wielding immense executive branch control in Vice, there is something to be said for retaining control over your assets. I like to tell my clients that estate planning really just allows you to direct who inherits what, when, and how. For most folks, they want to choose where their hard-earned property goes, not the government via Iowa’s intestacy laws.

I’d love to hear your take on films nominated this year, but I’d also like to discuss your estate plan! Don’t hesitate to contact me via email or by phone (515-371-6077). You can also get started on the creation of an estate plan by filling out my free, no-obligation Estate Plan Questionnaire.

i voted stickers

For most of us, the right to vote has been a part of our adult lives. It seems weird to think about not having the ability to cast a ballot. But, imagine if you lost your right to vote and had to take even extra steps to get it back? This is the reality for more than 50,000 Iowans, according to a 2016 report from The Sentencing Project. Indeed, Iowa is one of two states (the other is Kentucky) in the country that imposes permanent disenfranchisement for people, even after they’ve served their sentence and completed all probation requirements. (You may have seen the recent news when Florida passed an amendment giving Floridians who were previously denied voting rights the ability to register to vote.) I believe it’s incredibly important for all people to exercise their right to vote and thus want to draw attention to an upcoming opportunity at The University of Iowa for those who have had their voting rights revoked due to a felony conviction. (While I’m not personally involved, I know people who are!)

i voted sticker red

Iowans who have lost their voting rights can restore them only through submitting a “Right to Vote and Hold Public Office” application to the Office of the Governor. The Governor then has the discretion to restore voting rights. (Governor Reynolds has restored the voting rights for 88 people since taking office in 2017.) While certainly a hurdle, the good news is that the state has recently streamlined the application to make it easier to complete. Additionally, Governor Reynolds has made public statements calling for a constitutional amendment to do away with the state’s lifetime ban on voting for felons, but that would take at least a couple legislative sessions for actual adoption per the state’s amendment process.

Voting Rights Restoration Clinic Info

In the meantime, the application is still essential for people looking to restore their voting and ability to hold public office rights. The University of Iowa Legal Clinic is hosting an opportunity for application assistance and advice for anyone interested. See the image below for more information and contact the Clinic at 319-335-9023 to reserve a spot. (Note: if you’re not able to participate on March 2, 2019, there are other opportunities for the Clinic to offer assistance, so don’t hesitate to call.)

voter rights restoration clinic

 

football on field

For two formidable teams (New England Patriots vs. Los Angles Rams), it’s the culmination of a season. (And for us, it’s a great excuse to indulge in all the best tailgating snacks.) It’s a grueling seven-month schedule with tons of variables from pre-season training camp to regular season kick-off to post-season playoffs.

Just like all the games leading up to the Super Bowl, a lot can happen throughout a lifetime. So many variables, so many strategies, upsets, and so many potential outcomes.

While it may be difficult to ponder the inevitably of your own timer running out, preparation for what happens after your season ends is indeed necessary.

football estate plan

The Main Players

Estate plan – An estate plan is the whole playbook, generally containing the following documents: your will; healthcare power of attorney; financial power of attorney; disposition of personal property; and final disposition of remains.

Will – A will is a superstar which can accomplish so much for your team. For example, who will quarterback the distribution of your property at the end of the game? You need to make certain the will is well crafted, solid, and can stand up in court. Keep in mind though, important assets such as retirement assets and investment accounts may well contain beneficiary designations that actually trump your will.

Health care power of attorney  & financial power of attorney – Don’t let a sudden disability completely take you out of the game. Have someone strong come off the bench to carry you to your personal goals.

Trust – You have lots of different options with this multi-tool MVP. A trust can help your team in so many different ways and provide you huge advantages in every facet of the game.

Get a Good Playbook!

Thorough planning is the best way to plan for the end of your season so that you and your family are never caught unprepared. When you are no longer around to coach and care for the rest of your “team,” make sure they are both provided for and are provided training on how to keep pushing forward by settling your affairs. A comprehensive estate plan, written by an experienced estate planner, is the best way to do this.

No ‘I’ in Team

Your loved ones and close friends are all a part of your team; part of being a strong team player is including them on the plays you’re making. Discuss important aspects of your estate plan with the people it involves to avoid any confusion or conflict when it comes times for them to carry out your wishes. For instance, if you have minor children (under age 18) you’re going to want to establish legal guardianship if the worst happens and you’re no longer around to care for them. You’ll want to discuss with your chosen guardians ahead of time to make sure they’re willing and available to carry out the responsibility.

Lineup Adjustments

Pro football coaches switch up who’s starting for the best winning strategy. Similarly, you may well need to make adjustments to your estate plan “lineup” as things inevitably change over the course of your life. Big events like marriage, birth of a child/grandchild, moving to a different state, a large change in financial status, divorce, and other significant changes are good reason to review your designated representatives, beneficiaries, and overall goals.

Charity Factor

Pro football players make bank, but many also make significant contributions to charities they care about. Some NFL players have founded their own charitable foundation, while others focus on a few nonprofits whose missions they care deeply about. For instance, Chris Long, the Eagles defensive end, announced last fall he will donate his entire salary ($1 million) from the season to educational charities. Most players also work together as a team to give back to their communities. The league as a whole also supports building awareness for nonprofits through initiatives like “My Cause, My Cleats.”

Given their high profile sports status, these players also help inspire folks across the country to do the same. (In one great example, these football fans donated to NFL players’ favorite nonprofits!) You too can be a fierce philanthropist, but without actually having to sprint, throw, or sweat! You can include your favorite charities in your estate plan as beneficiaries. Then there are the other charitable giving tools that can be included as a part of your “end game” like charitable gift annuities and the charitable remainder trust.

Winning Score

I cannot predict who will win the Super Bowl today, but I can say without a doubt that you never know when the game is going to change. You never know when you (and/or your team members) are going to need any one of the documents a part of your estate plan. So, you need to have your “playbook” written out ASAP…well, you can wait until after the big game!

The best place to start on your estate plan is with my free, no-obligation Estate Plan Questionnaire. You can also shoot me an email or give me a call at 515-371-6077 to discuss your situation (or football).

Marting Luther King Jr. and American Flag

On Martin Luther King Jr. Day, I think it’s important to pay tribute to a man who truly championed ideals of equity, freedom, peace, and justice. Among his many accomplishments, Dr. King tirelessly pushed for nonviolent activism and peaceful resolution to human rights issues. He reportedly wrote five books and gave hundreds of speeches in a single year…more than most of us could produce in a lifetime. And, there’s no doubt that he was a key player and influencer in the passage of the U.S. Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dr. King was subsequently was awarded one of the highest honors in the world in 1964—the Nobel Peace Prize—for “his dynamic leadership of the Civil Rights movement and steadfast commitment to achieving racial justice through nonviolent action.” (He donated the prize money, $54,123, back to the civil rights movement.)

Dr. King and his lasting legacy can undoubtedly serve as an inspiration to us all. I see his dream of a better world—a better future for all—exemplified in action by the hardworking Iowa-based nonprofit organizations. I also see his lessons being practiced by the wonderful donors who support these organizations and advance their missions.

So, yes, it’s nice to have a day off of work, but make certain the day doesn’t pass you by without setting a plan in place to perform some form of service for others. Dr. King tirelessly pursued the advancement of human rights for the greater good and we can honor him by practicing forms of charitable giving as a way to advance the greater good for our communities. Be it through volunteering time to an organization that speaks to your heart (remember, certain costs associated with volunteer can be tax deductible), setting up a donor-advised fund, or simply writing a list of the nonprofits you would like to include as beneficiaries in your will, you too can set out on an honorable service-oriented path and inspire your friends, family, and colleagues to follow suit.

MLK Jr. Day Quote

Dr. King’s lessons resonate with our hearts and heads because we too have dreams of making our corners of the world a better place to learn, live, and grow through service. Maybe Dr. King’s commitment to “practice what you preach” mentality has inspired you this year to give charitably more and more often. Maybe you considered his question, “What’s your life’s blueprint?” and decided to form the charity you’ve wanted to establish for a long time. Either way, don’t hesitate to contact me for a free consult. As Dr. King said: “The time is always right to do what is right.”