hand filling out tax form

In June 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a decision in South Dakota v. Wayfair that changed the way remote sellers (like internet companies) do business in states where they don’t have a physical presence, like a brick and mortar store or a headquarters. Essentially it means these companies will start collecting sales tax in certain states with economic nexus laws already on the books to enforce collection against said remote retailers. Iowa is one such state.

What does this mean for you and your nonprofit? Most nonprofits may start seeing sales tax tacked on to certain receipts for digital accounts/services. (The rate of sales tax is based on your Iowa primary contact address.) But, some nonprofits are exempt from sales tax and therefore will need to remit an exemption certificate to the remote seller.

writing tax on a check

Taxes and Nonprofits

The interplay between taxes and nonprofits can be confusing. Even if a nonprofit is exempt from state and federal income taxes, it does not mean that entity is auto exempt from paying sales tax for goods and (taxable) services. Generally, sales taxes must be paid unless the nonprofit falls under the umbrella of some other applicable general sales tax exemption. (Local option sales taxes must also be paid on purchases made in existing areas.)

However, the Iowa Code does exempt certain nonprofits from paying sales tax on purchases. The Iowa Department of Revenue’s guide to “Iowa Tax Issues for Nonprofits” provides a (non-exclusive) list of entities that are specifically exempt from sales/use taxes under Iowa law. I’ve included the pretty lengthy list here for your convenience!

  • American Red Cross
  • Navy Relief Society
  • U.S.O. (United Service Organizations)
  • Community health centers (as defined in 42 U.S.C.A. subsection 254c)
  • Migrant health centers (as defined in 42 U.S.C.A. subsection 254b)
  • Residential care facilities and intermediate care facilities for the intellectually disabled and residential care facilities for the mentally ill (licensed by the Department of Inspections and Appeals under Iowa Code chapter 135C)
  • Residential facilities for intellectually disabled children (licensed by the Department of Human Services under Iowa Code chapter 237)
  • Residential facilities for child foster care [licensed by the Department of Human Services under Iowa Code chapter 237, except those maintained by “individuals” as defined in Iowa Code subsection 237.1(7)]
  • Rehabilitation facilities which provide accredited rehabilitation services to persons with disabilities and which are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities or the Accreditation Council for Services for intellectually disabled and other developmentally disabled persons and adult day care services approved for reimbursement by the Iowa Department of Human Services
  • Community mental health centers (accredited by the Department of Human Services under Iowa Code chapter 225C)
  • Home and community-based services providers certified to offer Medicaid waiver services by the Department of Human Services that are any of the following:
      • Health and disability waiver service providers, described in 441 IAC 77.30.
      • Hospice providers, described in 441 IAC 77.32.
      • Elderly waiver service providers, described in 441 IAC 77.33.
      • AIDS/HIV waiver service providers, described in 441 IAC 77.34.
      • Federally qualified health centers, described in 441 IAC 77.35.
      • Intellectual disabilities waiver service providers, described in 441 IAC 77.37.
      • Brain injury waiver service providers, described in 441 IAC 77.39.
  • Sales of tangible personal property and services made to nonprofit hospitals and nonprofit hospices (licensed under Iowa Code chapter 135B)
  • Statewide nonprofit organ procurement organizations
  • Nonprofit legal aid organizations
  • Nonprofit organizations organized solely for the purpose of lending property to the general public for nonprofit purposes
  • Nonprofit private museums*
  • Governmental units, subdivisions, or instrumentalities of the federal government or of the state of Iowa (This includes state, county, and local subdivisions of the government of the State of Iowa and those of any other state which provide a similar sales tax exemption to Iowa and its political subdivisions.) *
  • Recreational lake and water quality districts*
  • Federal corporations created by the federal government which are exempt under federal law *
  • Private nonprofit educational institutions located in Iowa *
  • Private nonprofit art centers located in Iowa
  • Habitat for Humanity in Iowa when purchasing building materials *
  • Toys for Tots when purchasing toys
  • Community action agencies as defined in Iowa Code section 216A.93
  • Substance abuse treatment or prevention facilities that receive block grant funding from the Iowa Department of Public Health

Sales Tax Exemption in Action

So, let’s say you’re an Iowa private nonprofit grade school that subscribes to an online newsletter service (which is based in California) so that administrators can design, write, and send a weekly email update to parents of students. Your organization would likely be exempt from the new sales tax charges imposed by the remote seller on your subscription rate.

Down to the Details

Exempt nonprofits must pay for their purchases from the entity’s account and should complete and submit an Iowa Sales Tax Exemption Certificate 31-014 to the remote seller.

Questions? Not sure if your nonprofit qualifies for this exemption? Don’t hesitate to contact me at any time to speak about your situation.

Thanks for reading the 25 Days of Giving series; this is the “gift” for day 3! Plan on coming back to the blog every day from now through Christmas Day.

Might this be a good season to consider being more generous to your place of worship? Generally, churches are considered to be public charities. This means they are typically exempt from local, state, federal, and property taxes. This also means donations can be deducted if you itemize your federal income taxes.

Allow me to offer up four tips which could allow you to give more to your church and pay less in taxes. It’s a win-win situation: make a financially wise contribution AND a difference in an organization you care about.

Tip 1: Consider All Your Assets

You need to consider ALL your assets for smart giving. Don’t just consider cash, but look at your entire basket. Here are three real-world examples:

  1. I know a farmer who doesn’t have lot of cash on hand—we’ve all heard the phrase, “land rich, cash poor.” But, farmland itself can be a very tax-savvy gift. So are gifts of grain.
  2. I know a young person who’s self-employed. Again, not lots of cash on hand. But, this person inherited an IRA from a relative, and must make annual required minimum distributions [RMDs]. IRA RMDs can be a tax-wise gift.
  3. I also know a couple who recently retired. The couple has three life insurance policies, which made lots of sense when their kids were younger. Their kids are now grown and independently successful. A paid up life insurance policy could be signed over to their favorite charity.

Your individual facts and circumstances are unique. Consider seeking a qualified attorney or financial advisor to look at your whole basket of assets.

Tip 2: Consider Long-Term Capital Gains Property

Gifts of long-term capital assets, such as publicly traded stock and real estate, may receive a double federal tax benefit. Donors can receive an immediate charitable deduction off federal income tax, equal to the fair market value of the stock or real estate.

Records are required to obtain a federal income tax charitable deduction. The more the charitable deduction, the more detailed the recording requirements. For example, to receive a charitable deduction for gifts of more than $5,000, you need a “qualified appraisal” by a “qualified appraiser,” two terms with very specific meanings to the IRS. You need to engage the right professionals to be sure all requirements are met.

Second, assuming the donor owned the asset for more than one year, when the asset is donated, the donor can avoid long-term capital gain taxes which would have been owed if the asset was sold.

Let’s look at an example to make this clearer. Sara Donor owns stock with a fair market value of $1,000. Donor wants to use the farmland to help her favorite causes. Which would be better for Sara? To sell the stock and donate the cash? Or, gift the stock directly to her church? Assume the stock was originally purchased at $200 (basis), Sara’s income tax rate is 37%, and her capital gains tax rate is 20%. 

Donating cash versus donating long-term capital gain assets, such as publicly traded stock Donating cash proceeds after sale of stock Donating stock directly
Value of gift $1,000 $1,000
Federal income tax charitable deduction ($370) ($370)
Federal capital gains tax savings $0 ($160)
Out-of-pocket cost of gift $630 $470

NOTE: ABOVE TABLE IS FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY. ONLY YOUR OWN FINANCIAL OR TAX ADVISOR CAN ADVISE IN THESE MATTERS.

Again, a gift of long-term capital assets made during lifetime, such as stocks or real estate, can be doubly beneficial. The donor can receive a federal income tax charitable deduction equal to the fair market value of the asset. The donor can also avoid capital gains tax.

Tip 3: Consider Endow Iowa Tax Credit Program

Under the Endow Iowa Tax Credit program, gifts made during lifetime can be eligible for a 25% tax credit. There are three requirements to qualify:

  1. The gift must be given to, or receipted by, a qualified Iowa community foundation (there’s a local community foundation near you).
  2. The gift must be made to an Iowa charity.
  3. The gift must be endowed (i.e., a permanent gift). Under Endow Iowa, no more than 5% of the gift can be granted each year – the rest is held by, and invested by, your local community foundation. This final requirement is a restriction, but still, in exchange for a 25% state tax credit, it must be seriously considered by Iowa lawyers and donors.

Tip 4: Combine the First Three Tips!

Let’s look again at the case of Sarah, who is donating stock per the table above. If Sarah makes an Endow Iowa qualifying gift, the tax savings are dramatic:

Tax benefits of donating long-term capital gain asset with Endow Iowa
Value of gift $1,000
Federal income tax charitable deduction ($370)
Federal capital gains tax savings ($160)
Endow Iowa Tax Credit ($250)
Out-of-pocket cost of gift $220

NOTE: ABOVE TABLE IS FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY. ONLY YOUR OWN FINANCIAL OR TAX ADVISOR CAN ADVISE IN THESE MATTERS.

Note Sara’s significant tax savings! In this scenario, Sara receives $396 as a federal charitable deduction, avoids $160 of capital gains taxes, and gains a state tax credit for $250, for a total tax savings of $806. Put another way, Sara made a gift of $1,000 to her favorite charity, but the out of pocket cost of the gift to her was less than $200.

giving package with green spruce

Each donor’s financial situation and tax scenario is unique; consult your own professional advisor for personal advice. I’m happy to offer you a free consult to discuss your charitable giving options. I can be reached by phone at 515-371-6077 or by email.

blue and tan present

Thanks for reading the 25 Days of Giving series! Plan on coming back to the blog every day from now through Christmas Day.

In December there is gift giving with wrapping paper abound, but when it comes to charitable giving the important assets (like your retirement assets) don’t need ribbons or bows. Let’s first focus on a major retirement asset giving tool, the IRA charitable rollover.

IRA Charitable Rollover

This federal law allows donors age 70½ and older to make direct distributions of up to $100,000 from his/her IRA each year to any qualified charity. The donation is not treated as taxable income and, moreover, counts toward the donor’s required minimum distribution for that year.

At the end of 2015, Congress made the IRA charitable rollover a permanent giving tool, unlike the year-to-year renewal basis they had operated on since the introduction of the IRA charitable rollover in 2006 (as part of the Pension Protection Act).  The result? Tax savvy IRA account holders can now plan charitable giving in a more reliable way.

Other Options

There are two other accessible ways to direct retirement benefit plan assets to your favorite charity:

  • Gifts at death via beneficiary designations.
  • Withdrawals over age 59½ followed by outright deductible gifts that can effectively result in tax-free retirement plan gifts.

Keep in mind, too, that the IRA charitable rollover applies only to IRAs. These two options — gifts at death via beneficiary designations and withdrawals by those older than 59½ — will work with virtually all qualified retirement plans, including 401(k)s and 403(b)s. baubles on a green tree

Naming your favorite charity as beneficiary

Donors considering charitable bequests may not realize that they can make a meaningful gift simply by naming their favorite charity as the beneficiary of an IRA, 401(k), 403(b), or other retirement plan. Giving retirement assets in this way is easy, and does not require drafting or amending a will or trust. A donor simply has to contact his/her financial institution holding the retirement benefit plan and request a change of beneficiary form.

Note, however, that if the account holder is married, the spouse should be informed and may have to consent to the gift. The plan assets may also be left to a charitable or marital trust[s]. In the latter case, professional advisors should be consulted. (Hint: call me!).

Give now!

Donors could also choose to make current gifts using funds withdrawn from their qualified retirement plans. Individuals over age 59½ may generally withdraw funds from retirement plans without penalty, make a gift with these funds, and then claim an offsetting charitable deduction. In most cases, a gift made in this manner will be a “wash” for tax purposes.

Let’s take a quick example. Rebecca (age 64) wants to make a very generous donation of $10,000 to her favorite charity. She can withdraw $10,000 from her IRA or 401(k) account, and make that donation. Assuming she itemizes her tax deductions, the $10,000 donation should leave her “even Steven” with regard to taxes – the $10,000 in income is offset by the $10,000 charitable deduction, resulting in zero net income taxes.

Advice is Priceless

The decision to want to give to you favorite causes this season is easy. Knowing exactly where to start with smart giving can be a little more complex. If you have questions about the IRA charitable rollover or any other giving strategy, don’t hesitate to reach out via email or by phone (515-371-6077). My firm’s mission is to maximize charitable giving in the state of Iowa and I want to help YOU maximize your personal charitable giving (in a way that is also tax efficient).

holiday wreath with ornament

Thank you for reading the 25 Days of Giving series! In the spirit of the holiday season I’m covering different aspects of charitable giving…perfect to get you thinking about your end-of-year giving.

I came across an article in Forbes about two tax court cases where families claimed large charitable contributions on their federal income tax and, given that they were fraudulent claims, failed to have the substantiation to back it up. As the article stated, “the IRS is NOT messing around when it comes to holding taxpayers to the substantiation requirements for charitable contributions.” The substantiation is required in exchange for the federal income charitable deduction.

Note there is, of course, a limit to the charitable deduction on your taxes. Mind this when considering maxing out your charitable deduction.

Substantiation requirements

First and foremost, the donations must be made to a qualified charitable organization. You must then be able to substantiate your contribution to said qualified charitable organization. The record keeping required by the IRS depends on the amount of your contribution. At their most basic, the IRS substantiation rules for the charitable deduction are as follows:

  • Gifts of less than $250 per donee — you need a cancelled check or receipt
  • $250 or more per donee — you need a timely written acknowledgement from the donee
  • Total deductions for all property exceeds $500 — you need to file IRS Form 8283
  • Deductions exceeding $5,000 per item — you need a qualified appraisal completed by a qualified appraiser

Gifts of $250 or more per donee

Let’s focus for today on gifts of $250 or more per donee. Specifically, the income tax charitable deduction is not allowed for a separate contribution of $250 or more unless the donor has written substantiation from the donee of the contribution in the form of a contemporaneous written acknowledgement.

The $250 threshold

Note this $250 threshold is applied to each contribution separately. So, if a donor makes multiple contributions to the same charity totaling $250 or more in a single year, but each gift is less than $250, written acknowledgment is not required. [Unless the smaller gifts are related and made to avoid the substantiation requirements].

Written acknowledgment

The written acknowledgement must indicate:

  1. the name and address of the donee;
  2. the date of the contribution;
  3. the amount of cash contributed;
  4. a description of any property contributed;
  5. whether the donee provided the donor any goods or services in exchange for the contribution; and, if so;
  6. a description, and a good faith estimate, of the value of the good or services provided or, if the only goods or services provided were intangible religious benefits, a statement to that effect.

Contemporaneous acknowledgement

The IRS definition of contemporaneous is that the acknowledgment must be obtained by the donor on or before the earlier of:

a. the date the donor files the original return for the year the donation was made; or

b. the return’s extended due date.

A donor cannot amend a return to include contributions for which an acknowledgment is obtained after the original return was filed.

Responsibility lies with the donor

Interestingly, the responsibility for obtaining this documentation lies with the donor. The donee (the charity) is not required to record or report this information to the IRS on behalf of the donor.

If this sounds like a lot, know you don’t have to navigate these requirements just by yourself. Contact me at any time to discuss your situation and charitable giving goals. We’ll figure out the best course of action together.

red ornaments Endow Iowa Tax Credit

 Thank you for reading the 25 Days of Giving series! In the spirit of the holiday season I’m covering different aspects of charitable giving…perfect to get you thinking about your end-of-year giving.

There are many, many reasons Iowa is great place to live and work. One reason is the Endow Iowa Tax Credit Program—a smart way to stretch your charitable dollars. Iowa community foundations provide exclusive access to the Endow Iowa Tax Credit program. Giving through the Endow Iowa program allows Iowa taxpayers to receive a 25% Iowa tax credit, in addition to the federal charitable income tax deduction, for qualifying charitable gifts.

The Endow Iowa Tax Credit Program provides unique opportunities to meet philanthropic goals while receiving maximum tax benefits. Highlights of this program include:

  • A variety of gifts qualify for Endow Iowa Tax Credits including cash, real estate, grain, appreciated securities, and outright gifts of retirement assets. In fact, appreciated assets, like stocks or real estate, can provide even better value because the donor may avoid capital gains taxes.
  • To be eligible, gifts must benefit an Iowa charity.
  • Tax credits of 25% of the gifted amount are limited to $300,000 in tax credits per individual for a gift of $1.2 million, or $600,000 in tax credits per couple for a gift of $2.4 million, assuming both are Iowa taxpayers.
  • Eligible gifts will qualify for credits on a first-come/first-serve basis until the yearly appropriated limit is reached. If the current available Endow Iowa Tax Credits have been awarded, qualified donors will be eligible for the next year’s Endow Iowa Tax Credits. Donors should be encouraged to to act as early in the year as possible to ensure receipt of credits as soon as possible.
  • All qualified donors can carry forward the tax credit for up to five years after the year the donation was made.

There is one “catch.” Funds can only be granted at a spend rate of 5% per year. It should also be noted that the Endow Iowa Tax Credits are capped. The Iowa Legislature sets aside a pool of money for Endow Iowa, and it’s available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Submitting an application at the beginning of the tax year is advised, as tax credits often run out toward year’s end. In fact, this year approximately $6 million in tax credits were awarded and there are no more available credits to be granted. However, you can submit your application to be placed on the wait list for 2019 tax credits.

In exchange for 25% Iowa tax credit and the opportunity to have an even greater impact on their philanthropic interests in the state of Iowa, now and into the future, the Endow Iowa Tax Credit Program should be seriously considered by all. The impact is immense: in 2016, donors received tax credits for more than 4,030 separate donations to at least 120 different community foundations and affiliate organizations through Endow Iowa. And, since 2003, more than $215 million has been invested through the program to improve residents’ lives.

Any questions or thoughts on how the Endow Iowa Tax Credit Program could mean big benefits for your finances and your state? Don’t hesitate to contact me.

lights on roof

Thanks for reading the 25 Days of Giving series where w a’re “unwrapping” important info on various aspects of charitable giving each day through Christmas. Share with friends, family, & colleagues to inspire others to also make meaningful gifts this season.

If you’re making a non-cash charitable donation of over $5,000, first off, high five! That’s going to go a long way toward helping your favorite charity or advancing a cause you feel passionate about. Because you’re a smart donor, you’re also probably planning to claim the federal income tax charitable deduction as a way of reducing your taxes. In order to do this, gifts of that size come with specific requirements from the IRS that you’ll want to be sure to meet.

Requirements for “qualified appraisal” and “qualified appraiser”

Non-cash gifts of more than $5,000 in value, with exceptions, require a qualified appraisal completed by a qualified appraiser. The terms “qualified appraisal” and “qualified appraiser” are very specific and have detailed definitions according to the IRS.

Qualified appraisal

money on table

A qualified appraisal is a document which is:

  1. made, signed, and dated by a qualified appraiser in accordance with generally accepted appraisal standards;
  2. timely;
  3. does not involve prohibited appraisal fees; and
  4. includes certain and specific information.

Let’s further examine each of these four requirements.

“Qualified appraiser:” Appraiser education and experience requirements

An appraiser is treated as having met the minimum education and experience requirements if she is licensed or certified for the type of property being appraised in the state in which the property is located. For a gift of real estate in Iowa this means certification by the Iowa Professional Licensing Bureau, Real Estate Appraisers.

Further requirements for a qualified appraiser include that s/he:

  1. regularly performs appraisals for compensation;
  2. demonstrates verifiable education and experience in valuing the type of property subject to the appraisal;
  3. understands she may be subject to penalties for aiding and abetting the understatement of tax; and
  4. not have been prohibited from practicing before the IRS at any time during three years preceding the appraisal.

Also, a qualified appraiser must be sufficiently independent. This means a qualified appraiser cannot be any of the following:

  1. the donor;
  2. the donee;
  3. the person from whom the donor acquired the property [with limited exceptions];
  4. any person employed by, or related to, any of the above; and/or
  5. an appraiser who is otherwise qualified, but who has some incentive to overstate the value of the property.

Timing of appraisal

clock against background s

The appraisal must be made not earlier than 60 days prior to the gift and not later than the date the return is due (with extensions).

Prohibited appraisal fees

The appraiser’s fee for a qualified appraisal cannot be based on a percentage of the value of the property, nor can the fee be based on the amount allowed as a charitable deduction.

Specific information in required in appraisal

Specific information must be included in an appraisal, including:

  1. a description of the property;
  2. the physical condition of any tangible property;
  3. the date (or expected date) of the gift;
  4. any restrictions relating to the charity’s use or disposition of the property;
  5. the name, address, and taxpayer identification number of the qualified appraiser;
  6. the appraiser’s qualifications, including background, experience, education, certification, and any membership in professional appraisal associations;
  7. a statement that the appraisal was prepared for income tax purposes;
  8. the date (or dates) on which the property was valued;
  9. the appraised fair market value on the date (or expected date) of contribution;
  10. the method of valuation used to determine fair market value;
  11. the specific basis for the valuation, such as any specific comparable sales transaction; and
  12. an admission if the appraiser is acting as a partner in a partnership, an employee of any person, or an independent contractor engaged by a person, other than the donor, with such a person’s name, address, and taxpayer identification number.

Appraiser’s dated signature and declaration

Again, a qualified appraisal must be signed and dated by the appraiser. Also, there must be a written declaration from the appraiser she is aware of the penalties for substantial or gross valuation.

Reasonable cause

Tax courts have held that a taxpayer’s reliance on the advice of a professional, such as an attorney or CPA constitutes reasonable cause and good faith if the taxpayer can prove by a preponderance of the evidence that: (1) the taxpayer reasonably believed the professional was a competent tax adviser with sufficient expertise to justify reliance; (2) the taxpayer provided necessary and accurate information to the advising professional; and (3) the taxpayer actually relied in good faith on the professional’s advice.

If this sounds like a lot, know you don’t have to navigate these requirements just by yourself. Contact me at any time to discuss your situation and charitable giving goals. We’ll figure out the best course of action together.

charitable gift tax limits - hand holding christmas gift

If you choose to itemize your taxes, charitable contributions can reduce your tax bill. Generally you would choose to itemize when the combined total of your anticipated deductions (like charitable gifts) add up to more than the standard deduction. For 2018 taxes the standard deductions are:

  • $12,000 for single individuals
  • $12,000 for married, filing separately
  • $24,000 for married filing jointly
  • $18,000 for head of household

If you do choose to itemize, limits on federal income tax charitable deductions are quite high, but they do exist. Keep this in mind as you make any year-end donations. The specific limitations are complicated, and there are numerous exceptions. The limits are based on your AGI (adjusted gross income). AGI is an individual’s total gross income minus specific deductions.

A quick rule-of-thumb for different types of donated assets to public charities:

  • Appreciated capital gains assets (such as stock) up to 20% of AGI
  • Non-cash assets up to 30% of AGI
  • Cash contributions, up to 60% of AGI
  • You can deduct transportation costs and other expenses related to volunteering

Note that these rates are for public tax-exempt organization and private operating foundations. Contributions to certain private foundations, veterans organizations, fraternal societies, and cemetery organizations are limited to 30% adjusted gross income. (Check out these IRS status codes and deductible limits if you’re unsure of an organization’s limit.)

As I mentioned, most people won’t exceed these limits indicated above, but it can happen. For instance, if Jane Donor is a retiree living off of savings and donates more than her investments yield over the year, her limit could be exceeded. The good news is that in this case the IRS allows you carry over excess contributions for up to five following tax years.

Don’t forget to take these steps if you plan to itemize your charitable deductions:

  • Make sure the nonprofit organization is a 501(c)(3) public charity or private foundation
  • Keep a record of the contribution (usually the tax receipt from the charity)
  • Depending on the donation amount/type, you may need to obtain a qualified appraisal to substantiate the claimed value of the deduction
  • Subtract the value of any benefits you received for your charitable contribution before you deduct it

I’m happy to advise on your situation and help you maximize your charitable giving for this tax year. I can be reached by phone at 515-371-6077 and by email at gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com.

Santa with Heart

Thanks for reading the 25 Days of Giving series! Share with friends, family, & colleagues to inspire others to also make meaningful year end gifts this season…and plan ahead for 2019 charitable goals.

Under the new tax code, you may have changed the ways in which you give or the tax-beneficial strategies you employ with your charitable giving. What hasn’t changed, is that you may choose to deduct from your federal income tax any charitable contributions of money or property made to qualified organizations if you itemize your deductions. But, there are record keeping requirements you’ll want to stay on top of, so you’re not scrambling during tax time!

Payroll deduction substantiation

Making a charitable deduction directly from your paycheck is a great and steadfast way to be sure to meet your charitable giving goals. For charitable contributions made via payroll deductions, the donor needs two documents to substantiate the gift:

  1. a pay stub, W-2, or other document furnished by the employer that sets forth the amount withheld from the taxpayer during a taxable year by the employer for the purpose of contributing to a charity;
  2. a pledge card or other document prepared by or at the direction of the charity that shows the name of the charity.

Donors who give to a local United Way or other organizations that funnel contributions to other charities need to only obtain the pledge card or other document from the United Way and not from the affiliated charities which ultimately receive the money.

Payroll deductions of $250 or more

Tax law requires that for any contribution of $250 or more, the taxpayer must substantiate the contribution by a contemporaneous written acknowledgement of the contribution by the charity. For payroll deductions, the contribution amount withheld from each payment of wages to a taxpayer is treated as a separate contribution for purposes of the $250 threshold.

So, for example, a taxpayer who gave $300 over the course of a year through payroll deductions, $30 per paycheck over ten paychecks, would not trigger the $250 substantiation requirement. The substantiation requirement would only kick in if $250 or more is withheld from each paycheck.

If any of this is confusing, know you don’t have to navigate these requirements just by yourself. Contact me at any time to discuss your situation and charitable giving goals. We’ll figure out the best course of action together!

The title of this sounds pretty lacking in the “merry and bright” department…especially considering this is the 25 Days of Giving series! But, the name here describes a little-known deduction beneficial for volunteers…and nonprofits to stress to volunteers to indeed encourage more volunteering!

The IRS does NOT allow a charitable deduction for volunteering your services. However, out-of-pocket expenses relating to volunteering are deductible. Yes, seriously!

Any given charity should provide volunteers with a description of the contributed services and state whether there has been any transfer from the charity of goods or services back to the donor. In addition to other out-of-pocket expenses, mileage is deductible at the IRS rate. Also, expenses like tolls and parking can be deductible.

For example, if a volunteer travels to attend a meeting or conference sponsored by the charity, then there is a deduction only if there is “no significant amount of personal pleasure” in the meeting. This has become known as the “no smile” rule. To be deductible, the principal purpose of the meeting must be to further charitable goals (aka operative mission). Which, if you think about it, is something worth smiling about!

2 girls "no-smile rule"

Any questions as to what donors can and can’t deduct? If you’re a nonprofit organization you may have questions about the extent of information you’re required to provide. I welcome any questions on the topics. Gordon can be easily reached by phone at 515-371-6077; by email at gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com.

Candles and christmas tree for charity auction

Thanks for reading the 25 Days of Giving series! Share with friends, family, & colleagues. Knowledge is indeed a “gift” when it comes to encouraging and maximizing smart charitable giving

Headed to a holiday party this season? If it’s to celebrate/fundraise for your favorite charity, you might experience an auction (silent or otherwise). Charity auctions can be great fun and it feels like you’re giving back while also gaining a great gift to tuck under the Christmas tree!

Sometimes charity auction participants mistakenly believe their successful bids are completely deductible. However, since the individual receives the auction property, there is usually no federal income tax charitable deduction. But, if the bid can be shown to be in excess of the fair market value of the item, the amount in excess can be deducted as a charitable contribution.

The charity may make a “good faith estimate” of the fair value of the auction item before bidding commences.

Noel at charity auction

Let’s look at a few easy examples:

Example 1. A $50 gift certificate to a retail store is purchased at charity auction for $40. No deduction.

Example 2. A different $50 gift certificate to the spa is purchased at the charity auction for $70. This generates a $20 charitable deduction.

Example 3. You bid on and win a fruit basket for $30 at an auction supporting a local high school basketball program. The equivalent fruit basket at a local grocery store would cost $15, so you may receive a $15 tax deduction.

Unsure if your actions at a charity auction mean a charitable deduction? It’s always a good idea to get a second opinion. Also, if you’re a nonprofit leader planning on hosting a charity auction it’s advantageous to be briefed on all the tax and legal rules surrounding the event in case donors ask. I’m always happy to help and offer a free one-hour consultation. Reach me by phone at 515-371-6077 or by email at gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com.