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woman in front of painting

The headlines are abuzz with a new world record for any artwork sold at an auction or privately. Leonardo da Vinci’s painting, “Salvator Mundi,” sold for $450.3 million (including the auction house fees) at Christie’s in New York to a private buyer, after an intense 20 minutes of phone bidding.

Why such a high price when the piece definitely had a good deal of scrutiny around it? For instance, it was major part of an art scandal known as “The Bouvier Affair,” was central in a legal dispute, and had been heavily restored. Additionally, it’s authenticity is doubted by some experts as not a work by the grand master himself, but perhaps his studio. Nevertheless, the piece was executed around 1500 on a commission for King Louis XII of France, was lost for centuries, and was not publicly rediscovered until an estate sale in the U.S. in 2005 where the piece, thought to be a copy, was purchased by a group of buyers for just $10,000. It’s thought to be one of fewer than 20 paintings known to exist by da Vinci. “Christie’s called the work ‘the Last da Vinci,’ the only known painting by the Renaissance master still in a private collection (some 15 others are in museums).”

All of this art excitement brings up an interesting situation to consider: how do you incorporate your art collection into your estate plan? Sure, you likely don’t have an authentic da Vinci, Renoir, or Klimt just hanging in your living room, but maybe you have a couple pieces you inherited or a growing modern art collection.

Value of a Passion

For most collectors the art isn’t about monetary value, but more so about a passion for a certain period, artist, or medium. Collecting is often an act of genuine appreciation for the fine arts. Considering both the intrinsic and market value of your art collection it’s ESSENTIAL you include it as a part of your estate plan. The collection is, after all, a part of your total estate’s value and they way it’s handled in your estate plan could impact the value of your gross estate in regards to the federal estate tax. When it comes to the estate planning goal of avoiding such taxes and fees the appraised value of your art is paramount to consider. Naturally you want your collection to be well-treated following your passing, as well as retain its value.

Let’s go through some important steps and elements to consider.

Assemble Documentation

Value of the collection will be important to the estate plan. If you haven’t done so already, you must correctly catalog, photograph, insure, and appraise the collection. You should also gather all documentation such as appraisals and bills of sale that will need to accompany the artwork as it changes hands upon your estate plan’s execution.

Weigh Your Options

With an art collection there are three main options for disposition within your estate plan (or to be executed during your life).

Donate

Donating your art to a charitable organization or a museum is an excellent way to practice smart charitable giving. It can also be one of the more simple options. Donate through your estate plan following your death and the estate will receive a tax deduction based on the current valuation. Give while you’re living and you can take an income tax deduction, also based on the value of the piece or collection at the time of the donation.

With this options you and the recipient organization should agree to signed terms and conditions BEFORE the artwork delivery. Details can include specifics as to where and how the art is to be displayed, if you want your name on the signage next to the painting, and similar details.

museum art collection

Bequest Artwork to your Loved Ones

Another common option is to keep the art within the family by passing along the art along to your estate’s heirs. Yes, you could gift each individual piece to each family member, but if you want to keep the collection in tact you could transfer the collection to a trust you create while living that can be updated and changed during your lifetime. A trust is a solid estate planning tool that allows your named trust beneficiaries to avoid estate tax and probate complications and fees. In the formation of your trust you can also define the terms for care and condition of the artwork.

You could instead bequest the collection to an entity like an LLC you create. In this case your heirs would own interest in the LLC instead of each owning a piece of art. In your estate plan and in the development of the entity you can appoint a manager (or multiple managers) who make sales or purchasing decisions for the collection.

framed art collection

Sell

It goes without staying that art is expensive—to buy and to sell. There are benefits (and detriments) to this option during life and after death, but waiting to sell until after death means the art’s value will be included in the estate. As such the capital gains tax could be lessened or entirely eliminated because the tax basis for the art collection is increased to fair market value at the time of death, instead of what you paid for the art/collection. If you instead would like to sell while alive you can likely expect to pay a capital gains tax on top of a sales commission fee and sales tax (among other potential fees).

black and white art collection

Give, gift, sell—whatever option you choose, select a plan that allows you to feel at peace with where and to whom your collection is headed.

Enlist an Expert

Regardless of what option you want to pursue in the disposition of your art work, you need to work with an experienced estate planner who can help navigate the complexity of your estate. It’s your estate planning lawyer who can help you establish a framework for passing along your artwork to your chosen beneficiaries.

Discuss With Your Family

Depending on your family dynamic, discussing your estate plan with your loved ones can be difficult. It can bring up emotion and hard topics like mortality, however to avoid litigation, mitigate in-fighting, and to help determine what’s the best course of actions forward for your property it’s necessary. When it comes to your art collection, your heirs may not feel the same way about the artwork that you do and knowing these opinions is critical in the decision of what to do with the collection.

When having the conversation, cultivate an environment in which your family can discuss openly and freely without judgement. You want their honest opinions as a part of your decision in what to do with your collection in the event of your passing.

art graffiti


Just as the art itself can be exceedingly complex, so can incorporating said art into an estate plan. You probably have questions; don’t hesitate to reach out at any time via email or phone (515-371-6077). I offer a free one-hour consultation and would love to help you protect your artistic assets through quality, individualized estate planning.

Let’s set everything straight about all the benefits and important aspects of a health care power of attorney.

What is a health care power of attorney?

A health care power of attorney (“POA”) is a legal instrument that allows you to select the person (called an “agent”) that you want to make health care decisions for you, if and when you become unable to make such decisions for yourself.

healthcare power of attorney

What types of decisions can be made by a health care POA?

A health care POA can govern any decision related to your health that you want to address. A health care POA may include decisions related to organ donation, hospitalization, treatment in a nursing home, home health care, psychiatric treatment, end-of-life (i.e. the use of life support), and more.

When would I use a health care POA?

A health care POA is used when you become unable to make health care decisions for yourself. Your agent will be able to make decisions for you based on the information you provided in your health care POA. Equally important, your agent will be access your medical records, communicate with your health care providers, and so on.

doctor stethoscope

What happens if I don’t have a health care POA?

If you don’t have a health care POA, and you should become disabled to the point where you are unable to make health care decisions for yourself, the hospital will do everything possible to save your life.

Your family, without guidance from you, will be faced with agonizing decisions. Your family members may not be able to agree on how to handle your medical care. Or, you might disagree with the decision your family ultimately makes.

If your family can’t agree on a course of action, they would have to go to an Iowa Court and have a conservator/guardian appointed for you. It may, or may not, be someone you would have chosen. Further, the conservator/guardian may make decisions you wouldn’t have made.

This is all very complicated, time consuming, and expensive.  A health care POA simplifies this process by giving you control over how decisions are made for you and allowing you to choose who will carry out your wishes. Best of all, it leaves your family with peace of mind.

Is there a “one-size-fits-all” POA for health care?

No! All Iowans are special and unique, and so are each individual’s issues and concerns. Consequently, this article is presented for informational purposes only, not as legal advice. Please consult your lawyer for personal advice.

Do I need other estate planning documents in addition to a health care POA?

Yes, definitely! (It’s even essential for college students.) There are six “must have” estate planning documents that make up a complete, comprehensive estate plan. (Plus some people may also need to consider a trust.)


Do you have a health care POA currently? And do you have a complete estate plan? Why or why not? I’d be most interested in any thoughts or comments. Email me anytime at gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com or call 515-371-6077.

Pets are a huge part of many families. They are there to snuggle you, greet you every day when you come home, and share so many of life’s best memories with you.

For most people, planning what happens to your loved ones, including pets, is a big contributor to sound peace of mind. Fortunately, the State of Iowa is one of 28 states to adopt a Uniform Probate Code law on animal trusts, most often referred to as “pet trusts.” It reads as follows:

633A.2105 Honorary trusts — trusts for pets.

  1. A trust for a lawful noncharitable purpose for which there is no definite or definitely ascertainable beneficiary is valid but may be performed by the trustee for only twenty-one years, whether or not the terms of the trust contemplate a longer duration.
  2. A trust for the care of an animal living at the settlor’s death is valid. The trust terminates when no living animal is covered by its terms.
  3. A portion of the property of a trust authorized by this section shall not be converted to any use other than its intended use unless the terms of the trust so provide or the court determines that the value of the trust property substantially exceeds the amount required.
  4. The intended use of a trust authorized by this section may be enforced by a person designate

Pet trusts include the following elements:

  • Selecting a caregiver to attend to the daily needs of your pet.
  • It is recommended to name a second caregiver, in case the first can’t adequately care for the pet or decides not to do so.
  • You can include instructions for day-to-day needs as well as overall healthcare. You can be as general or as specific as you’d like.
  • You can set aside monetary distributions, on the condition that it is used for your pet’s needs.
  • The monetary distributions may include a reward/stipend for fulfilling the caregiver role.

Let’s talk about your furry friends and how we can ensure they are provided for in case something happens to you. Give me a call at 515-371-6077 or shoot me an email at gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com.

Here’s the worst-case scenario: You’ve passed away and your family falls, expectedly or unexpectedly, into a tumultuous state. They all have different opinions on how your estate plan should be interpreted, and one or more beneficiaries want to contest the distributions. While everyone knows it’s all about the money, there are easily enough legal “hooks” on which to hang a lawsuit: it can be contested that there has been undue influence, document forgery, breach of fiduciary duty, or that the deceased testator was not of sound mind.

Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

Litigation over an estate plan is terrible for everyone involved. For the sake of your family’s well-being work now to avoid this problem in the future—I really cannot express this enough.

Three Best Ways to Avoid Litigation

  1. Have a plan. Having an estate plan that is carefully planned and well thought out, created by an experienced estate planner, and completed well in advance of any death or disability is the single best way to avoid litigation.
  2. Talk about it. It’s critically important to discuss your final wishes with your loved ones and beneficiaries. Clear the air now. Don’t leave it up for future interpretation.
  3. Include a clause that discourages litigation. An experienced estate planner can include a provision in your estate plan to shut out a beneficiary if s/he brings litigation. (This is also important why you need an actual lawyer to help craft your estate plan.)

I would love to discuss your individual estate plan needs; contact me via email at gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com or give me a call at 515-371-6077.

estate plan sale

WHAT IS AN ESTATE PLAN SALE?

For a limited time only (June 15 to July 15, 2017), you can receive a standard estate plan (which consists of six “must-have” estate planning documents) for only $500 (five hundred dollars). You will be billed only at the conclusion of this process, when you are executing the documents. So, obviously, you won’t pay anything until you are completely satisfied with both the plan and your understanding of the plan.

man working at desk on computer

What if you need or want, something more than the standard estate plan? Like, say, a revocable living trust? A standard estate plan, including a revocable living trust, will only cost you $1,000 (one thousand dollars). A revocable living trust accrues several benefits, including avoiding probate; saving costs, taxes, and fees; getting bequests to beneficiaries more quickly; and privacy.

I should note that either package comes with as many consultations (meetings, emails, and phone calls) with me as you reasonably feel we need to finish your estate plan. Again, you’re not sitting down to execute the documents, and so you’re not being billed (let alone paying anything!), until you are completely satisfied with both the process and the results of the process.

Gordon Fisch Estate Plan

WHY?

Why have an estate plan sale? Several reasons, actually.

To begin, the mission of my law firm is to promote and maximize charitable giving in Iowa. Straight up, the more estate planning Iowans do, the more charitable giving will occur.

Sure, not everyone who constructs an estate plan uses it to give to charities, but many do. Again – it’s simply a numbers game; the more estate planning, the more money flowing to worthwhile causes.

Also, 60% of Americans don’t have a will/estate planning. I want to help combat that statistic in Iowa. We can do better. Working together, we will do better.

Grandpa face

Finally, everyone deserve access to a secure future and a legacy. For these reasons, I’m offering very special rates.

HOW?

How much money are you saving? Quite a bit actually!

Speaking very generally, an estate plan from my Firm usually costs a single person about $700, and a family about $850. So, under this Estate Plan Sale, that’s a saving of about $200 for singletons to $350 for your family!

Family: mom, son, and dad

Also, speaking very generally, an estate plan including a revocable living trust, from my Firm, usually costs a single person about $1,300, and a family about $2,200. So, under this Estate Plan Sale, that’s a saving of about $300 for singletons and a whopping savings of $1,200 for your family!

WHERE?

Any Iowan is eligible. I am licensed to practice law in Iowa, and I have clients all over the state. In our modern age of emails, scanning, and cell phones, mere physical distance is not an issue.

I have clients from Burlington and Carroll to Sioux City and Urbandale. If you want to work with me, I want to work with you, and we can easily find ways to do so.

HOW?

I write about my process at length, but it’s just five steps! Seriously, it’s not that painful, it truly isn’t. My clients report back to me that they have such relief and peace of mind when it’s completed.

Peace signs at the golden gate bridge

WHEN?

NOW! RIGHT NOW!

Again, the special deal of $500 for a standard estate plan, and $1,000 for a standard estate plan plus a revocable living trust, will last only a limited time, June 15 to July 15, 2017. I’m already backlogged, so ACT NOW. Do not wait!

We all know, of all the seasons, summer goes by the fastest. Time can run out on you; don’t let that happen.

You can reach me most easily by email at gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com or call my cell, 515-371-6077. Don’t delay—write or call today.

A great place to start in on the process is with my Estate Planning Questionnaire.

mom and son on street

DISCLAIMERS

The Estate Plan Sale merely relates to pricing and in no way creates an attorney-client relationship, nor any other kind of professional relationship. The Estate Plan Sale merely relates to pricing and does not create a contract or agreement of any kind.
GFLF, P.C. retains full and total discretion as to who it chooses to serve as clients and why. GFLF, P.C. retains the right to refuse service to anyone it chooses.
The Estate Plan Sale may not apply to individuals or families with a net worth of more than $1 million dollars. (You still need an estate plan, very much so, but it necessarily needs to be much more “complex.”).
two women sitting on bench

One of the worst-case scenarios for any family is to avoid estate planning conversations completely because you risk offending a loved one or family member.

I’ve known some couples who haven’t been able to agree on an important decision, such as who will take care of the children in the event of them both passing. Since they can’t reach an agreement they decide to bypass the conversation entirely and leave their children without a legal guardian. Which is, of course, the worst possible decision of all!

How you communicate your wishes to your family depends entirely on the family dynamic. One interesting concept I’ve heard of for family heirloom-decisions, is to give your beneficiaries monopoly money and have them bid against each other for different items in an auction format. While that could make for a fun (albeit competitive) game night, it’s important that your loved one realize the importance and finality of an estate plan.

No matter how you determine decisions such as property dispersal, a professional estate planner can help you fully understand all the implications of your estate plan.

Tricky Family Situations

I’ve seen variations of this potentially tricky situation many times.

Three brothers grow up on a farm. Eventually, two of the brothers moved to the city while the third continued to run the farm’s operations. When their parents passed away, the third brother who had managed the farm, inherited the entire property while the brothers received none of the farm assets. As you can imagine, even if two of the brother’s were not actively involved in the farm’s operations, if the parents died without discussing the estate arrangement with all of their children conflict could ensue between the siblings.

Then consider if the parents in this scenario divided out the farm assets between the brothers, whether or not they had a hand in helping manage the property. The brother who actually, actively manages the farm may feel slighted. Either way such situations are made thorny when there’s no up front, clear communication.

Bottom Line

 

 

two young people talking near beach

Estate planning can be an extremely difficult decision-making process. It is something that should be discussed with your loved ones, family members, and beneficiaries, especially when your choices may take them by surprise. Help everyone — yourself included — achieve peace of mind by seeking professional help to draft a sturdy estate plan. And then your estate planner can help you communicate your decisions to your loved ones.

Have questions? Need more information?

A great place to get started with any estate plan is with my free (no obligation) Estate Plan Questionnaire or feel free to reach out at any time.

final resting place black balloons

There are six main documents that should be part of almost everyone’s estate plan. One of these is called “Disposition of Final Remains.” This document is where you tell your loved ones exactly how you want your body to be treated after you pass away.

It’s best to approach the subject of final disposition of remains with thoughtfulness, consideration, and, yes, indeed, even a little levity. Discussing your passing can feel morbid or even downright creepy. However, taking the time to think through your final services (whatever it is you want) is a wonderful gift to your family. It ensures that clear instructions are passed on, and alleviates, perhaps even eliminates, the avalanche of headaches that inevitably accompanies such planning.

Your estate plan’s disposition of remains directs your family and friends as to how you want your remains handled after you have passed away. This includes your funeral, service, and maybe a place of internment. If you want a party complete with a piñata you can detail that in the disposition of remains. Choices for what to do with your physical remains can include earth burial, above-earth burial, or cremation . . . or you could always go with something unique to you, like being made into a diamond. Some of my clients have insisted that there be only the shortest and simplest of memorial services. Others have wanted a marching band and fireworks shooting their ashes into the sky. (Yes, that is a thing). It’s completely up to you.

multi-colored fireworks

 

What is incredibly important is that you leave clear instructions of your desires, whatever they may be. That way, your loved ones won’t have to guess as to what you would have wanted, during a time that is already stressful, turbulent, and full of grief. Again, leaving behind a fully thought out “disposition of final remains” is a wonderful gift to your loves ones.

Have questions? Need more information?

A great place to start is the Estate Plan Questionnaire. Feel free to reach out at any time; you can contact me by email at Gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com or give me a call at 515-371-6077.