Posts

headphones and pink flowers

Speaking of the most romantic holiday of the year, I’ve really LOVED writing the #PlanningForLove series in the lead up to Valentine’s Day this year. We’ve been able to cover some super important aspects of an estate plan and how, oddly enough, estate planning is one of the ultimate expressions of love.

I have no doubts that after reading posts on how you can show love to your spouse, pets, and even yourself through estate planning you are ready to take the first step and fill out my (free) Estate Plan Questionnaire. Thinking about your estate’s executor, beneficiaries, and charitable bequests can only be made better with a special Gordon Fischer Law Firm Valentine’s playlist. (You can also check out my other estate planning-inspired playlist while you’re at it!)

What are your favorite love songs of all time I should add to this playlist? Let me know in the comments below. (Also, I apologize if “My Heart Will Go On” is now stuck in your head.) Want to discuss your estate planning options? Don’t hesitate to contact me via email or phone (515-371-6077).

cute puppy

In the lead up to Valentine’s Day, I’m exploring here on the blog how love can translate to estate planning. Thus far we’ve covered the best V-Day gift to give your spouse, advice on where to store your estate plan (and it’s not a chocolate heart box!), and how an affinity for football makes understanding estate planning easy. Romance and gift guides aside, this #PlanningForLove series would be incomplete without featuring the love for your pet.

Let’s be for real for a minute. The relationships we have with our pet(s), be they a dog, cat, amphibian, pocket piglet, parrot, or pony are some of the most comforting and consistent. Who else will lick your face, eat snacks out of your hand, demand belly rubs, or get the most Instagram likes? Our pets are a part of our family and it only makes sense to include them in estate planning documents and decisions concerned with the continued care for our loved ones.

cat with flowers

The best way to include your furry and feathered friends in your estate plan is with an animal care trust (sometimes known as a pet trust). This is a special kind of trust different from a living revocable trust or an inter vivos trust. An animal care trust specifically provides for the care of your pet in the event that something were to happen to you. In the trust you’ll likely want include the following information:

  • Sufficiently identify your pets and include a provision that describes your pets as a class through phrasing such as  “the pet(s) owned by me at the time of my death or disability.”
  • Describe your pet’s standard of living, care, and include any regular and special instructions. You can get as specific or general as you want at this point. For example, if your bird only likes a particular brand/type of food, or your dog thrives when she plays catch once a day, this can be specified in a trust agreement. If you want your pet to visit the veterinarian for check-ups three times a year, this can also be written in.
  • Determine the amount of funding that’s needed to adequately cover the expenses for your pet’s care. Generally, this figure can’t exceed what may reasonably be required given your pet’s standard of living.
  • Designate a trustee, caregiver, and remainder beneficiary. Also, designate successor trustees and caregivers if for some reason either becomes unable or unwilling to fulfill their role. The remainder beneficiary is who receives the trust assets if trust funding outlives the beneficiary (your pet).
  • Specify how the funding should be distributed to the caregiver from the trust.
  • Provide instructions and wishes for the final disposition of your pet (for example, via burial or cremation).

Check out and feel free to share this infographic with your fellow pet parents. (Click here to see the pdf version.)

gordon fischer law firm animal care trust

Valentine’s Day is coming up, so let’s discuss how to show your continued love for your pets, even if something unexpected were to happen to you. Contact me via email or phone (515-371-6077).

neon LOVE

One major way we can show our loved ones how much we care about them is by making our wishes known for when we’re no longer there to tell them. Estate planning is one of the best ways to do that, especially concerning wishes regarding what’s to be done with the physical body after death. One of the six main documents a part of any estate plan is called the “disposition of final remains.” In this document, you can detail how you want your body to be treated after you pass away, along with any ceremonial aspects. You may be as specific or as general as you wish.

If you’ve ever had someone close to you die and have been tasked with making arrangements for the wake, funeral, and burial or cremation (or otherwise), you know it can be difficult. Not only are you dealing with heartache and grief of losing that loved one, but now you’re also dealing with the organizational aspects of death. If you die without an estate plan, and without clear instructions in a disposition of final remains document, you’ll be leaving your loved ones with a headache on top of the inevitable heartache. The ambiguity surrounding final remains can lead to fighting between family members if they disagree over what would be best. That’s why taking the time to think through your final services is a wonderful gift and a great way to show your loved ones how much you care.

Let’s go through some of the basics related to this important, valuable document.

What Does “Final Disposition” Mean Anyway?

Final disposition sounds, well, conclusive. Indeed, this is about what you ultimately want to be done with your physical body following death and can include burial (sometimes referred to interment), cremation, removal from the state (if you want to be buried in a different state), and other types of disposition. You may also detail if you wish, a funeral or other type of ceremony (maybe even a party) to be held. If you’ve purchased a burial plot or want to be laid to rest in the family mausoleum, you would include those details here.

Choose a Designee

In the disposition of final remains document, you can designate one or multiple adults to assume responsibility for carrying out your wishes, similar to how you designate an executor to carry out the wishes as written in your will. Your designee (or designees) can be whomever you choose, just be sure to speak with them to make certain they are comfortable and accepting of the role.

Of course, the designee must be a competent adult. The Act also allows for alternate designees to be named in the event the primary designee is unable to act. The Declaration is not allowed to include directives for final disposition of remains and arrangements for ceremonies planned after death.

If something were to happen to you without a disposition of final remains document in place, the surviving spouse (if there is one) assumes the role as designee. If there is no surviving spouse, then the designee role passes to any surviving children. If there are no surviving children then the role would pass to the parents of the decedent, then grandchildren, surviving siblings, and finally surviving grandparents.

Can I Change My Mind?

Your wishes may change over time and that’s OK because the disposition of final remains is revocable. That means you can change your designee if one becomes unable or unwilling. (Regardless of whether or not you want to amend your disposition of final remains document, you should review your estate plan annually to see if any major life events require updates.)

How do I Start?

Because the disposition of final remains document is a key part of your estate plan, it’s best to get started with my free Estate Plan Questionnaire. Questions or want to discuss your personal situation? Contact me at any time via email or phone (515-371-6077).

Pop the popcorn, uncork the champagne, and put on your best red-carpet duds to tune into the 92nd Academy Awards tonight! In between award envelopes and amazing performances, consider how your 2020 Oscar ballot has some surprising connections with estate planning. It may sound like a stretch, but hear me out while you watch the pre-show coverage.

Anything Could Happen

If you’re a film buff who has managed to watch all nine of the Best Picture category nominees (first off, I’m jealous), you may have a strong opinion about which one deserves to win. However, just like life, anything could happen! You may bet that 1917 most certainly will be victorious, but in the end, You know one of the films will win, just like you know someday you’re going to pass away. However, you cannot know which one of the films will win ahead of time, just like you cannot know how and when your final scene will be.

Expecting the unexpected is what estate planning boils down to. With something fun and entertaining like the Academy Awards, surprises can make for ready Oscar party fodder. But, when it comes to your estate—all of your assets you worked hard to acquire—surprises can make for frustration and confusionin fighting for your family, extended probate time and fees, and assets being distributed in a way that you wouldn’t have chosen.

Estate planning allows you to make certain your loved ones and the charities you care most about “win,” regardless of when you pass away.

It’s All in the Family

Some of the films nominated this year have familial relationships as a central plot device in the scripts. For instance, the Greta Gerwig take on the Louisa May Alcott classic, Little Women, explores the relationships between four sisters, each unique in their talents and interests, from childhood through young adulthood.

The scenes of Jo, Amy, Meg, and Beth remind us that people are considered minor children until they turn 18, and parents should have guardianship defined through their estate plans. That way, if something were to happen to the minor’s legal guardian(s), they could be immediately placed under the care of another trusted adult. Unless guardianship has been established, the Iowa Courts must choose guardians for the minor child if the legal guardian died or was incapacitated. Unfortunately, with no clear choice as to what the former caregivers would have preferred, the Court must basically make its own and best determination as to who the parent(s) would have preferred and what would be in the best interest of the children. The Court may or may not, choose who the parent(s) would have actually named.

Leave a Lasting Legacy

Some of the greatest films of all time have won the “Best Picture” category and left a cinematic legacy that has lasted well beyond their premiere date. These movies and the stories they tell live on in infamy, as generation after generation experiences their contribution to the entertainment industry. Indeed, the plot of the nominee Ford v Ferrari explores what kind of lasting reputation a team can build in their attempt at besting the dominator of the day.

Perhaps one or more of the 2020 Best Picture nominees will join this upper echelon of cinema (and maybe not), but estate planning also allows you to also make a mark on your world—a chance to leave a lasting legacy. A legacy can be interpreted differently by different people. A legacy to you could mean leaving a sizable charitable bequest to your church or alma mater. It could also mean bequeathing your art collection to your favorite museum. It could mean establishing college funds for all of your children and grandchildren to represent your belief in continuous learning. Whatever you envision your legacy to be, an estate plan will allow you to shape it…think of it as your own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame!

hollywood walk of fame star

Retain Your Control

Power is a common theme in some of the films nominated this year. Whether it’s the Joker with its implicit theme on how the power of kindness can change the cycle of bad events for someone or De Niro in The Irishman detailing the inner politics and power grabs of the mob, there is something to be said for retaining control over your assets. I like to tell my clients that estate planning really just allows you to direct who inherits what, when, and how. For most folks, they want to choose where their hard-earned property goes, not the government via Iowa’s intestacy laws.

I’d love to hear your take on films nominated this year, but I’d also like to discuss your estate plan! Don’t hesitate to contact me via email or by phone (515-371-6077). You can also get started on the creation of an estate plan by filling out my free, no-obligation Estate Plan Questionnaire.

single pink carnation

Here on the GoFisch blog we’re covering how estate planning and love are two things that go together like hugs and kisses, red wine and chocolate covered strawberries, cute cards, and candles…just in time for Valentine’s Day!

If the sight of Valentine’s Day cards, heart-shaped candy, and overpriced stuffed animals give cause for an eye roll, you’re not alone. But, there’s no doubt that underneath all the conversation hearts that a holiday about love is worth celebrating…especially if it’s self-love. At the end of the day, there’s no greater love than the one you can cultivate for yourself.

Couples get a lot of attention on Valentine’s Day—from the overpriced card aisle to the heart-shaped chocolate boxes that are clearly the only way to tell someone “I love you.” But, the pink, red, and white modern iteration of the pagan fertility festival Lupercalia can take many forms including making it a day of “treat yo’self.” If you’re single, or simply are in need of a day to celebrate and connect with how awesome you are, Valentine’s Day need not be a day to exalt romance, but a holiday to celebrate love for yourself.

In terms of celebrating yourself, executing an estate plan is a natural fit. Why? Because estate planning allows you the chance to determine the direction of your legacy even after your physical life has passed. This principle can easily be remembered with one simple phrase: Give whatever I have to whomever I want, the way I want when I want.

That’s a celebration of your life if I’ve ever heard it—decisions that guide your hard-earned property and assets into the hands of beneficiaries whom you care for. Estate planning also saves your loved ones’ time, money, and the arduous intestate probate process. Don’t forget that estate planning can (and should) be personalized to entirely fit you! Have a best furry friend? You may want to consider an animal care trust. Have you invested in a fledgling art collection? You’ll want to review your three main options for art disposition. Own your own business? You’ll want to look into a trust and a business succession plan.

So, treat yourself to a nice bottle of wine, a delicious dinner, maybe even a day at the spa, but also download my Estate Plan Questionnaire. You deserve to celebrate yourself, your life, and your work. Questions? Want to talk about the individualized aspects of your estate plan? Don’t hesitate to contact me.

As Valentine’s Day approaches you’ll see all kinds of gift guides telling you if you get these gifts, your significant other will love you that much more. I’m here to present a different kind of gift guide: one with important gifts that you cannot buy from a store. These gifts are all a part of estate planning in one way or another. At this point, you’re thinking what does some legal/financial thing like estate planning have to do with a holiday that celebrates love? On the outset, not much. But, dive into the reasons behind proper estate planning and most often I find love is at the foundation for most folks.

man with bouquet of roses

Read on for a gift guide you definitely won’t find in a magazine!

For your Spouse: Review your Beneficiary Designations

Your estate plan is essential for the majority of your assets, but it doesn’t cover some important accounts that are passed along via beneficiary designations. Such accounts can include savings and checking accounts, life insurance, annuities, 401(k)s, pensions, and IRA accounts. Whoever is listed as the beneficiary on these accounts overrides what’s written in a will (if the two are different). That means keeping these beneficiary designations are super important. Let’s say you listed your first spouse as a beneficiary on your life insurance, ended up getting divorced, got remarried to a great person you have many happy years together and then you pass away. Unfortunately, you never changed the beneficiary designation and the ex-spouse inherits the money. More than likely you would have wanted the account assets to go to your current spouse. (More valuable than some heart-shaped Valentine’s jewelry, right?!)

It’s good practice to review all of your beneficiary designations if there have been any life events that would necessitate a change, addition, or update, such as a birth, death, or change of capacity in a beneficiary.

For the Entire Clan: Talk About your Estate Plan Decisions

It’s important to discuss your estate planning decisions with your family members both before and after the plan is executed. In drafting the estate plan you’ll need to indicate to your qualified estate planning attorney whom you’re entrusting the important roles of executor, attorney-in-fact, guardian, and other designated representatives to. Before naming someone in a legal document you should discuss the role with them first to be sure they are willing, able, and informed to the duties of the role.

strand of hearts

After the estate plan is executed you’ll want to discuss your estate planning decisions with loved ones, family members, and beneficiaries, especially when your choices may take them by surprise. How can a discussion be a gift, per se? Explaining your wishes is a way of expressing your love by heading off any confusion your family and friends may feel upon needing to execute your plan.

This is yet another reason to have an attorney draft your plan—your estate planner can help you communicate your wishes to your loved ones.

For your Kiddos: Nomination of Guardian

This is the kind of “gift” your child(ren) will hopefully never need to experience. One of the most critically important features of an estate plan is establishing guardianship for any minors (i.e., children under the age of 18) in your care. Why? In the tragic and terrible chance that something was to happen to you resulting in immense incapacitation or death, who do you want to care for your children? Nominating a guardian in your will allows you to select the people you know will love, care, and lookout for the best interests of your child.

Unless guardianship has been established, an Iowa Court must choose guardians. Unfortunately, with no clear choice as to what the former caregivers would have preferred, the Court must basically make its own and best determination as to who the parents would have preferred and what would be in the best interest of the children. The Court may or may not, choose who the former caregivers would have named.

For your Favorite Charity: Charitable Bequest

Valentine’s Day doesn’t just have to be mean about personal relationships! It can also be a day for sharing the “love” for charities you care deeply for. In making or updating your estate plan think about what charities are near and dear to your heart? Which organizations and how much would you want to leave for them? You can include your church, alma mater, local cause, or international organization in your estate plan as beneficiaries. It doesn’t cost anything extra, other than assets from your estate. Want a clearer picture of how a charitable bequest could help your favorite charity? Talk to the nonprofit’s leaders or fundraising staffers. I’ll bet they’ll tell you the result of your charitable bequest, no matter how big or small, can make an important impact.

Love can take on many forms and express itself through many different types of gifts and actions that show you care. Choose this Valentine’s Day to express your affection (be it for a significant other, your children, or a charity) with a “gift” that shows a clear investment in the relationship. And, speaking of amore, I would love to discuss any aspect of this gift guide with you! Contact me at any time.

football on field

For two formidable teams (Kansas City Chiefs vs. San Francisco 49ers), it’s the culmination of a season. (And for us, it’s a great excuse to indulge in all the best tailgating snacks.) It’s a grueling seven-month schedule with tons of variables from pre-season training camp to regular season kick-off to post-season playoffs.

Just like all the games leading up to the Super Bowl, a lot can happen throughout a lifetime. So many variables, so many strategies, upsets, and so many potential outcomes.

While it may be difficult to ponder the inevitably of your own timer running out, preparation for what happens after your season ends is indeed necessary.

football estate plan

The Main Players

Estate plan – An estate plan is the whole playbook, generally containing the following documents: your will; healthcare power of attorney; financial power of attorney; disposition of personal property; and final disposition of remains.

Will – A will is a superstar which can accomplish so much for your team. For example, who will quarterback the distribution of your property at the end of the game? You need to make certain the will is well crafted, solid, and can stand up in court. Keep in mind though, important assets such as retirement assets and investment accounts may well contain beneficiary designations that actually trump your will.

Health care power of attorney  & financial power of attorney – Don’t let a sudden disability completely take you out of the game. Have someone strong come off the bench to carry you to your personal goals.

Trust – You have lots of different options with this multi-tool MVP. A trust can help your team in so many different ways and provide you huge advantages in every facet of the game.

Get a Good Playbook!

Thorough planning is the best way to plan for the end of your season so that you and your family are never caught unprepared. When you are no longer around to coach and care for the rest of your “team,” make sure they are both provided for and are provided training on how to keep pushing forward by settling your affairs. A comprehensive estate plan, written by an experienced estate planner, is the best way to do this.

No ‘I’ in Team

Your loved ones and close friends are all a part of your team; part of being a strong team player is including them on the plays you’re making. Discuss important aspects of your estate plan with the people it involves to avoid any confusion or conflict when it comes times for them to carry out your wishes. For instance, if you have minor children (under age 18) you’re going to want to establish legal guardianship if the worst happens and you’re no longer around to care for them. You’ll want to discuss with your chosen guardians ahead of time to make sure they’re willing and available to carry out the responsibility.

Lineup Adjustments

Pro football coaches switch up who’s starting for the best winning strategy. Similarly, you may well need to make adjustments to your estate plan “lineup” as things inevitably change over the course of your life. Big events like marriage, the birth of a child/grandchild, moving to a different state, a large change in financial status, divorce, and other significant changes are a good reason to review your designated representatives, beneficiaries, and overall goals.

Charity Factor

Pro football players make bank, but many also make significant contributions to charities they care about. Some NFL players have founded their own charitable foundation, while others focus on a few nonprofits whose missions they care deeply about. For instance, Chris Long, the Eagles defensive end, announced last fall he will donate his entire salary ($1 million) from the season to educational charities. Most players also work together as a team to give back to their communities. The league as a whole also supports building awareness for nonprofits through initiatives like “My Cause, My Cleats.”

Given their high profile sports status, these players also help inspire folks across the country to do the same. (In one great example, these football fans donated to NFL players’ favorite nonprofits!) You too can be a fierce philanthropist, but without actually having to sprint, throw, or sweat! You can include your favorite charities in your estate plan as beneficiaries. Then there are the other charitable giving tools that can be included as a part of your “end game” like charitable gift annuities and the charitable remainder trust.

Winning Score

I cannot predict who will win the Super Bowl today, but I can say without a doubt that you never know when the game is going to change. You never know when you (and/or your team members) are going to need any one of the documents a part of your estate plan. So, you need to have your “playbook” written out ASAP…well, you can wait until after the big game!

The best place to start on your estate plan is with my free, no-obligation Estate Plan Questionnaire. You can also shoot me an email or give me a call at 515-371-6077 to discuss your situation (or football).

footballs on wall

Turn on ESPN, put on your jersey, and stock with fridge with a cold beverage…the College Football Playoff National Championship is this Monday, January 13, 2020. (The game kicks off at 8 p.m.) While reading up on the stats and predictions for a tiger showdown between the LSU Tigers and Clemson Tigers in New Orleans’ Mercedes-Benz Superdome, I couldn’t help but make a connection with estate planning. Goalposts to estate planning goals may seem like a stretch, but hear me out.

 

Football is a complex game—the field is full of moving parts and competing strategies; it’s a game of inches where just a few missteps or right moves can make a huge difference. Estate planning works the same way. Here are just five of the surprising similarities between estate planning and the game of football:

1. Your Clock Will Indeed Run Out

Just like every football season eventually comes to an end, your (hopefully long and healthy) season will also come to a close. When it does, you need a special kind of playbook for the rest of your team…AKA an estate plan. In this analogy, an experienced lawyer is a great coach who is going to help you put plans in place for when the game changes unexpectedly or the stadium lights turn off for the last time. And, just like so much can change over the course of a season, a lot will happen over the course of your lifetime. That’s where annual reviews and revisions after significant events fit in.

While it is often difficult for people to ponder their unavoidable exit off their own fictitious field, preparation for what happens after your season is over can be one of the most comforting aspects of financial and legal planning.

2. The Main Players

Let’s take this analogy a bit further and put some estate planning terms into football speak.

Estate – An estate is a whole playbook, containing the following documents: your will; health care power of attorney; financial power of attorney; disposition of personal property; and final disposition of remains. (Click on the link preview below to delve deeper.)

Will – A will deals primarily with the distribution of assets and care for minor children. You need to make certain the will is well-drafted, solid, and can stand up in court. Keep in mind though, important assets such as life insurance policy payouts, retirement assets, and investment accounts may well contain beneficiary designations that trump your will.

Trust – You have lots of different options with this player. A trust can dictate how your assets will be dispersed, the timeline and manner in which they are dispersed, and who’s overseeing the process.

3. You Must Make Mid-Season Starting Lineup Adjustments

Just as a coach may switch up who’s starting partway through the season, you may need to make adjustments to your estate plan as things inevitably change over the course of your life. Big events like marriage, birth of a child/grandchild, moving to a different state, a large change in financial status, divorce, and other significant changes are a good reason to review your “playbook.”

4. No ‘I’ in Team

Your loved ones and close friends are all a part of your team; part of being a strong team player is including them on the plays you’re making. Discuss important aspects of your estate plan with the people it involves to avoid any confusion or conflict when it comes times for them to carry out your wishes. For instance, if you have minor children (under age 18) you’re going to want to establish legal guardianship if the worst happens and you’re no longer around to care for them. You’ll want to discuss with your chosen guardians ahead of time to make sure they’re willing and available to carry out the responsibility.

5. Final Score

football on field

 

There are probably at least a few more good football analogies I could tie into the conversation of why you need an estate plan, but the most important takeaway is that you never know when the game is going to change. So, you need to have your “playbook” written out ASAP. The best place to start is with my free, no-obligation Estate Plan Questionnaire. You can also shoot me an email or give me a call at 515-371-6077 to discuss your situation (or football).

update estate plan blank page

The great thing about your estate plan is that once you have one, it never expires. However, it does need to be kept current with your life as well as applicable laws. Why? Keeping your estate plan updated and current is simply a smart part of planning. An outdated estate plan could more easily be challenged in probate court or create unnecessary tensions between your loved ones.

Because of this, I advise Iowans to review estate plans on an annual basis. Simply check in with your lawyer, and other professional advisors, every year or so. Some clients like to do this around the first of the year, others choose to do so on an easily remembered date like a  birthday or anniversary. Others pick a random date. Any date will work, just stick with it every year.

Seek the help of a professional advisors to update your estate plan, most especially when you undergo a major life change. A few of the most prominent examples:

  • You get married or divorced.
  • A birth or death occurs among your family  or other beneficiaries of your estate.
  • A person you chose to be a guardian, trustee, or executor dies or becomes critically disabled and unable to fulfill their responsibilities.
  • There is a change in the value and/or kind of property you own. Examples of this could be receiving an inheritance of some kind or right-sizing as retirement age approaches).
  • You move to another state or country, or you acquire significant property in another state or country. (A common example of this is buying a second home, like a condo in Mexico or lake house in Minnesota).

Any of these changes require careful (re)analysis of your estate plan.

If you have experienced any major life changes (including one not listed here), don’t hesitate to reach out to me at any time. If you’re not quite at this stage yet and first need the important key documents that comprise an estate plan, get started with my free, no-obligation Estate Plan Questionnaire.

GoFisch book club with coffee mug

It’s not hard to find books about estate planning, but if I’m being honest most are nonfiction guides and most are kind of dry and dull. Sure, they can act as a solid primer for what you may want to know about estate planning, but they do not make for cozy, wintery weekend reads. But it’s much easier, less complicated, and concise to work with an estate planning attorney who can tailor information to your needs.

To spare you from books you’ll hate, I try to recommend reads for the GoFisch Book Club that touch on my practice areas—estate planning, charitable giving, and nonprofits—that are also engaging. Kicking off 2020, I’m adding “The Last Will and Testament of Henry Hoffman” by John Tesarsch to the GoFisch bookshelf.

After their eccentric (or reclusive, depending on how you see it) father commits suicide, three adult siblings are left to reckon with the father’s will that leaves his full estate to an unknown woman. Secrets unravel and the strings of grievances and grief intertwine as the siblings come apart fighting over their inheritance. Without disclosing any spoilers, this is more of a family drama than a legal one, but the bits and pieces of will contests serve as a warning sign that should hopefully inspire all readers to get their ducks in a row. Indeed, while largely set in Australia, this familial breakdown and conflict over competing legal documents could happen almost anywhere.

Having practiced as a barrister in Australia, Tesarsch knows a thing or two about how estate planning can leave a lasting legacy. . . and a contested will can cause immense familial conflict.

What titles would you like to see me add to the GoFisch Book Club? I would love to hear what you’re reading. Shoot me an email, Facebook message, tweet, or Instagram DM to let me know.