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If you’ve been reading along with the 25 Days of Giving Series throughout December, thank you. If you’ve happened upon the GoFisch blog just now, welcome! I hope to see you back here often.

Giving for the sake of giving is great, however it’s financially wise to make certain your charitable donation is also beneficial in terms of your taxes.

Charitable gifts are defined by the IRS, at least for the purpose of qualifying for a charitable deduction from federal income tax. A review of statutes and caselaw show that the IRS attributes several major characteristics to charitable gifts:

Charitable intent

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There must be a clear and unmistakable intention on the part of the donor to absolutely and irrevocably to divest herself of both title and control of the property.

Irrevocable transfer

The irrevocable transfer of the present legal title and dominion and control of the entire gift to the charity so that the donor can exercise no further act of dominion and control over it.

Delivery

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The donor must deliver the gift to the charity. (Delivery can be made through a number of ways. This could be hand-delivered, like dropping off a check. It could also mean a secure electronic payment made on the charity’s website. In the case of charitable gifts of grain this could mean physically delivering the grain to a specific silo.)

Acceptance

The charity must accept the gift. For instance, you may want to donate part of your modern art collection to your favorite nonprofit, but if the nonprofit doesn’t have the resources to accept or doesn’t want the collection for some reason, it’s not a charitable gift.

Qualified organization

The donee must be an organization recognized as charitable by the IRS. You can use this IRS online search tool for organizations to see if the charity you’re considering donating to is recognized as tax-exempt.


Want to be sure your charitable gift is indeed a tax deductible charitable gift in the eyes of the IRS? What about charitable gifts or life insurance or a retained life estate? It certainly doesn’t hurt to take me up on my offer for a free one-hour consultation. Give me a call at 515-371-6077 or shoot me an email at gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com.

Santa with Heart

Thanks for reading the 25 Days of Giving series! Share with friends, family, & colleagues to inspire others to to also make meaningful year end gifts this season…and plan ahead for 2018 charitable goals.

You may deduct from your federal income tax any charitable contributions of money or property made to qualified organizations if you itemize your deductions. But, there are record keeping requirements you’ll want to stay on top of, so you’re not scrambling during tax time!

Payroll deduction substantiation

Making a charitable deduction directly from your paycheck is a great and steadfast way to be sure to meet your charitable giving goals. For charitable contributions made via payroll deductions, the donor needs two documents to substantiate the gift:

  1. a pay stub, W-2, or other document furnished by the employer that sets forth the amount withheld from the taxpayer during a taxable year by the employer for the purpose of contributing to a charity;
  2. a pledge card or other document prepared by or at the direction of the charity that shows the name of the charity.

Donors who give to a local United Way or other organizations that funnel contributions to other charities need to only obtain the pledge card or other document from the United Way and not from the affiliated charities which ultimately receive the money.

Payroll deductions of $250 or more

Tax law requires that for any contribution of $250 or more, the taxpayer must substantiate the contribution by a contemporaneous written acknowledgement of the contribution by the charity. For payroll deductions, the contribution amount withheld from each payment of wages to a taxpayer is treated as a separate contribution for purposes of the $250 threshold.

So, for example, a taxpayer who gave $300 over the course of a year through payroll deductions, $30 per paycheck over ten paychecks, would not trigger the $250 substantiation requirement. The substantiation requirement would only kick in if $250 or more is withheld from each paycheck.

If any of this is confusing, know you don’t have to navigate these requirements just by yourself. Contact me at any time to discuss your situation and charitable giving goals. We’ll figure out the best course of action together!