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two women talking about forming a nonprofit

Any good attorney worth their weight will advise you on multiple aspects of any given important action or decision. Let’s say you’re considering forming a new 501(c)(3). You may have thoroughly considered all the prospective benefits of a tax-exempt entity, but what about the responsibilities? Indeed, there are serious obligations that come along with creating and running a nonprofit. These can’t be overstated and should certainly be taken into account. Let’s dive into a few of them.

Monetary cost

Establishing a nonprofit organization does require a monetary cost including the filing fees to governmental agencies, such as the Iowa Secretary of State’s Office and the IRS. (The Iowa Secretary of State has a $20 filing fee, and the IRS 1023 Form has a current user filing fee of $600.) If you elect to hire a qualified nonprofit attorney to guide you through the formation process and draft the required forms, then that will be an additional cost.  (Although I would always argue a worthwhile one!)

Once the nonprofit is formed you’ll also want to invest in keeping your nonprofit organization on track, compliant, and successful. A major part of this is drafting and implementing quality internal and external policies and procedures. Again, a nonprofit lawyer can be a valuable asset and provide expertise here.

Cost of time & effort

On top of the monetary costs, there are additional costs of time and effort. It typically takes a few months to pull all the paperwork together for the formational documents—especially the lengthy Form 1023. After all the paperwork is submitted for IRS review, actual 501(c)(3) approval can vary in the time it takes. A submitted Form 1023 can take anywhere from a month or two to a year to make its way through the review process; the 1023EZ‘s turnaround time depends on the backlog of review at the time.

Even after all of the required documentation is submitted for recognition of exemption, the IRS may request additional information through follow-up questions and supporting materials. And, of course, actually operating the nonprofit will take significant, continuous time and effort which can range in extent, but can include new employee hires, nonprofit board orientations and training, and compliance with state and federal laws (like Sarbanes-Oxley, for instance).

The flip side of this is that nonprofit work is often incredibly rewarding and important, making the effort and time even more worthwhile. But, again, it’s something good to just keep in mind as you weigh all inputs to your nonprofit formation decision.

Paperwork

A nonprofit is required to keep detailed records and also submit annual filings to the state and IRS by particular deadlines to keep its active and exempt status. (Reminder: having well-written policies and procedures will make the annual filings, like Form 990, an easier process!)

Shared control

As an incorporator of a nonprofit, you will certainly have a say in the development of the organization. Although one who creates nonprofits may want to shape his/her creation, personal control is limited. A nonprofit organization is subject to laws and regulations, including its own foundational documents such as articles of incorporation and bylaws. An Iowa nonprofit is required to have a board of directors, who have certain legal and financial fiduciary duties to uphold. The board itself also has collective responsibilities, so no one person is held solely accountable. Board orientation, trainings, and materials—like a board handbook—organized in a specific way can go a long way toward ensuring the board is set-up for success in working toward the mission you as the founder envisioned.

Man writing on white board

Scrutiny by the public

In the eyes of the government and society alike, the nonprofit must be dedicated to the public interest in one area or another. This is where it derives its tax-exempt status. It’s also why its finances are open to public inspection. For these reasons, nonprofits must be steadfastly transparent in nearly all their actions and dealings.

Interested parties may obtain copies of a nonprofit organization’s state and federal annual information filings to learn about salaries, program expenditures, and other financial information. You should be able to view copies of exempt organizations’ forms for free on the IRS’ website, or you can request a copy from the organization and they must provide it. Additionally, to make it easy for the public, many nonprofits link to these documents on their website. The information can be useful to current and prospective donors, new board members and employees, and grant-making organizations.

I hate to sound like a broken record, but again, this is where superior policies like “public disclosure” and “Form 990 review” are paramount to the operation.

These responsibilities shouldn’t scare you off from forming your change-making organization, but rather important elements to be aware of from the beginning. Plus, if you know the big picture of what you’re getting into, you can plan by enlisting the appropriate professionals to help you with your endeavor!

Want to discuss how to move forward with your nonprofit? Don’t hesitate to take me up on my offer for a free consult and the 10 For 990 policy special! Contact me via email or by phone (515-371-6077).

spiral notebook

Submitting Form 1023 for “Application for Recognition of Exemption Under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code” to the IRS is cause for celebration for any organization seeking that coveted tax-exempt status. While waiting for the determination letter from the IRS regarding the application, there can be many uncertainties regarding what to tell donors about donations, and what to do about other submissions, like Form 990.

For oversight and evaluation purposes, most nonprofits need to annually file Form 990 (Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax) instead. Beyond aspects of the organization’s finances, Form 990 collects information related to practical and operational aspects like conflicts of interestSarbanes-Oxley compliance, and charitable gift acceptance. Submitting an annual filing is also essential to retaining the tax-exempt status.

When is Form 990 Due?

So, when is Form 990 due exactly? It depends on the end of your organization’s taxable year; the form is due the 15th day of the fifth month after the organization’s taxable year.  For most tax-exempt organizations that follow the typical calendar year (January 1 through December 31), this means Form 990 is due on May 15th every year.

notebooks on table

What Do New Nonprofits Need to Do?

What does this mean for new nonprofits and organizations waiting on the tax-exemption determination letter? Expect to submit a variation of Form 990 in the year following the close of the first tax year. This is the case even if the organization is still waiting on the determination letter from the IRS in regard to tax-exempt status.

So, for example, let’s say a nonprofit filed articles of incorporation with the Secretary of State and adopted bylaws in March 2019. The organization subsequently submitted Form 1023 to apply for tax-exempt 501(c)(3) status. In the governing documents, the organization’s tax year is established as the typical January to December. For this organization, they should expect to file Form 990 by May 15, 2020, with information related to the receipts for the 2019 operating year.

Plan Ahead to be Prepared to Submit

The full Form 990 is over 10 pages (not including additional schedules and written attachments), so no doubt your organization should have a jump start on the process. The best way to be prepared, year after year to avoid a failure to file, is to have updated and applicable policies asked about on the form readily available to be referenced. I’m offering a great deal that features 10 policies related to Form 990 for $990. The rate includes a comprehensive consultation to discuss your organization’s need and a round of reviews so we can make certain the documents fit your organization’s needs.

No matter what stage of the nonprofit process you’re at—from just getting started to hiring employees to board management—don’t hesitate to contact me with questions or challenges. I’m available via email (gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com) and by phone (515-371-6077).

hockey-rink-stanley-cup

Robert Frost famously quipped that writing poetry that doesn’t rhyme is like “playing tennis without a net.”

Right now, a different sport without a net is grabbing our attention. Currently, the NHL sports fans are tuned into the NHL All-Star Game where representatives from some of the best teams like the St. Louis Blues and Boston Bruins take to the ice. So, allow me to make a Frost-ian point about nonprofits in a hockey context.

For a nonprofit to operate without having proper policies and procedures in place, is like playing the NHL All-Star Game without a net – and without sticks, skates, helmets, or a puck. Without certain policies in place, a nonprofit simply cannot run properly. Without rules, there can be no expectations. Board members, officers, staff, donors, volunteers, and other stakeholders must work to ensure they’re not skating on thin ice. Give your stars the protection they need, and the tools they require, to be a winning team.

Where to Start?

From working with a wide range of nonprofit clients, I’ve learned that many want proper policies and procedures, but they are simply stymied or confused on where to start. That’s where an attorney well-versed in nonprofit law can come in.

Many nonprofits have to fill out an annual form, IRS Form 990. Form 990 is unique in that it not only asks about financial information but also many of its questions directly ask about policies and procedures. There are at least 10 major polices asked about on Form 990.

Special Offer!

I offer 10 major policies and procedures nonprofits definitely need for a flat fee of $990. This includes consultations and a full review round to make sure the policies and procedures fit the needs and operations of your particular nonprofit. Adopting the policies explained in this guide will ultimately save your nonprofit organization time and resources, and you can feel great about having a set of high-quality documents to guide internal operations, and present to the public.

All Nonprofits Need These 10 Policies

Whether a nonprofit is large or small, new or decades-old, a mission that is narrow or multi-faceted, all nonprofits should have these policies in place. Yes, these policies are asked about on Form 990, but even if a tax-exempt organization is not required to submit a variation of the 990, the benefits are still immense. In general, having policies in place provides a framework and the expectations for an organization’s executives, employees, volunteers, and board members. Such policies can also be referenced if/when issues arise.

Another major reason to have proper policies and procedures in place is that they provide a foundation for soliciting, accepting, and facilitating charitable donations.

Additionally investing in strongly written, organization-specific policies is a practice in preparation in case of an audit. (The IRS audits tax-exempt organizations, just as it audits companies and individuals.

Policy Highlight

Among the major policies and procedures included in my special 10 for 990 offer are the following. (You can download my free guide with more extensive information and explanations regarding these policies and procedures.)

Compensation

Under IRS rules, compensation for nonprofit staff must be “reasonable and not excessive.” The IRS recommends a three-step process for determining appropriate compensation: (1) conduct a review of what similarly-sized peer organizations, (2) in the same or similar geographic location, (3) of comparable positions.

Conflict of Interest

A conflict of interest policy should do two important things: (1) require board members with a conflict (or a potential conflict) to disclose it, and (2) exclude individual board members from voting on matters in which there is a conflict. If consistently adhered to, this policy can inspire internal and external stakeholder confidence in the organization, as well as prevent potential violations of federal and state laws.

Document Retention and Destruction

The document retention policy should specify what types of documents should be retained, how they should be filed, and for what duration. This policy should also outline proper deletion/destruction techniques.

Financial Policies & Procedures

This specifically addresses guidelines for making financial decisions, reporting the financial status of the organization, managing funds, and developing financial goals. The financial management policies and procedures should also outline the budgeting process, investment reporting, what accounts may be maintained by the nonprofit, and when scheduled auditing will take place.

Form 990 Review

Form 990 asks about . . . . Form 990! That’s about as meta as the IRS gets. Specifically, this policy covers how Form 990 was prepared and how it was approved. A written policy is incredibly useful in clarifying a specific process for distribution and procedure review by the board of directors.

Fundraising

This one may seem obvious, but almost every nonprofit needs a fundraising policy, as almost all nonprofits engage in some sort of charitable fundraising. Your organization is no exception! This policy should include provisions for compliance with local, state, and federal laws, as well as the ethical norms the organization chooses to abide by in fundraising efforts.

Gift Acceptance

If well-written and applied across the organization, the policy can help the organization to kindly reject a non-cash gift that can carry extraneous liabilities and obligations the organization is not readily able to manage.

Investment

Before investments are made on behalf of the organization, there should be a sound investment policy in place to define who is accountable for investment decisions. The policy should also offer guidance on activities of growing/protecting the investments, earning interest, and maintain access to cash if necessary.

Public Disclosure

Form 990 specifically asks the filing organization to report if certain documents are made available to the public, such as governing documents (like the bylaws), conflict of interest policy, and financial statements. Additionally, the form asks for the name, address, and phone number of the individual(s) who possesses the financial “books” and records of the organization.

Whistleblower

Nonprofits, along with all corporations, are prohibited by the federal government from retaliating against employees who call out, draw attention to, or “blow the whistle” against the employer’s practices.

Keeping Up-To-Date

If you already have some (or all) of the above-listed policies in place, seriously consider the last time they were updated. How has the organization changed since they were written? Have changes to state and federal laws impacted these policies at all? It may be high time for a new set of policies that fits your organization.

Why 10 For 990

The mission of Gordon Fischer Law Firm is to promote and maximize charitable giving in Iowa, and to that point I want to help every Iowa nonprofit be legally compliant. It’s like how the coach wants to do everything they can to help their team win on the ice. The 10 policies a part of this promotion will save you time, resources, and you can feel good about having a set of high-quality policies to guide internal operations and present to the public.

Again, for now, I’m offering these 10 policies—including needed consultations—for the low flat fee of only $990. Contact me anytime at gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com or give me a call at 515-371-6077. I look forward to discussing your tax-exempt organization’s needs and how we can set you up for compliance success.

sign here on phone

From online donations to individually-tailored policies and procedures there’s a lot for nonprofit professionals to stay on top of. One of the ways I like to serve my mission of promoting and maximizing charitable giving in Iowa is to help nonprofits leaders in the state understand the ever-changing regulatory landscape to be the most successful they can.

In December 2019 the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) announced that tax-exempt organizations are now required to electronically file certain documents. This comes after the passage of the Taxpayer First Act in July 2019, which affected tax-exempt organizations in tax years beginning after July 1, 2019. This is a change from the previous option where organizations had the option to mail in paper forms. Organizations that have previously filed paper forms should receive a notice from the IRS telling them of the change.

The following IRS forms should now be filed electronically:

Form 990, Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax
• Form 990-PF, Return of Private Foundation (or Section 4947(a)(1) Trust Treated as Private Foundation)
• Form 8872, Political Organization Report of Contributions and Expenditures
• Form 1065, U.S. Return of Partnership Income (if filed by a Section 501(d) apostolic organization)

I’ve written about Form 990 in-depth before. While nonprofits don’t generally file annual tax returns (hence the tax-exempt status) most nonprofits need to file an important annual information return (a version of Form 990). If you want to learn more, I recommend giving these posts a read:

Interested in other aspects of successful nonprofit operations and great governance? Confused about any other regulatory changes? Don’t hesitate to contact me for a consult at gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com and 515-371-6077.

operating reserves

Just like it’s a smart idea to have a personal “rainy day” fund just in case of an emergency home repair, surgery, or other unexpected large costs, the same goes for a nonprofit organization. Even nonprofits with solid income streams can be hit with unanticipated events, income, and unbudgeted expenses. In these situations, it’s vital to have that financial cushion in the form of operating reserves so the organization doesn’t suffer long-term, negative consequences from temporary dilemmas. Concurrently, it’s essential to have the board adopt and adhere to a policy outlining the details of the reserve.

A common scenario where operating reserves may be prompted can be when a source of a reliable income is withdrawn or reduced without expectation.

Important Elements of an Operating Reserve Policy

Every organization’s policy is going to look different, but there are a few general areas that should be addressed.

  • Purpose– Why is it important for the organization to build and maintain reserves?
  • Definitions- How are the types of reserves, calculation of targeted amounts, and intended use defined?
  • How the reserve is funded– An operating reserve is only as valuable as its reliability. The policy should set out a practical plan for replenishment to the targeted amounts. Often, a worthy reserve goal is about three to six months of expenses. At the very least, on the low end, reserves should cover one full round of payroll.
  • When the reserve can be used– The plan should layout when the reserves can be tapped when unexpected shortfalls hit. The reserves should not be used to address foundational finance issues. In a “last straw” scenario, operating reserves can be used to close down the organization.
  • Classify the operating reserve as unrestricted– Unlike restricted funds that are marked for specific programs and projects, the operating reserve should be set as unrestricted so that the board and management can employ as they choose when the crisis calls for it.

That’s Not All

Because each nonprofit is unique, each nonprofit is going to need policies and procedures tailored to their specific operations. That said, generally, there are at least 10 policies most nonprofits need to be prepared to address on the annual information filing, Form 990. Check out my free guide to nonprofit policies and procedures.

Additionally, keep in mind that an operating reserves policy should be written to correspond with any other financial-specific policies, like an investment policy.

Want to discuss your nonprofit’s policy needs? Don’t hesitate to contact me at 515-371-6077 or gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com. I’m based in Cedar Rapids, Iowa but will travel to meet with nonprofit pros all across the state.

reading gift acceptance policy article

I love the opportunity to write for the Iowa State Bar Association‘s monthly publication, The Iowa Lawyer. I enjoy even more that you don’t have to be an attorney, judge, or even work in the legal field to read it! I recommend all nonprofit professionals, as well as professional advisors that advise nonprofits, to give my latest piece a read. Entitled “Minding the GAP: Why Every Nonprofit Needs a Gift Acceptance Policy,” the article (on page 24) overviews:

  • what this important policy entails
  • why it’s essential
  • what provisions should be included
  • different types of charitable gifts to consider when drafting the policy

minding the GAP - why every nonprofit needs a gift acceptance policy

That all said, a gift acceptance policy is just one of many policies that each nonprofit should have drafted to fit their unique mission and operations. Other documents to review, adopt, and employ include:

I’m happy to discuss any elements regarding how a gift acceptance policy can help your organization; don’t hesitate to contact me by phone (515-371-6077) or email (gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com).

man holding glasses talking about employment policies

Employment policies are vital to the well-being of your nonprofit. Such policies set workplace expectations, define work guidelines, reduce or eliminate confusion and misunderstanding, and provide steps for any necessary disciplinary action. Because every nonprofit organization is unique, your organization may well need a particular set of specific policies. However, the following are the general ones that benefit most all nonprofits.

Benefits of Employment Policies

An official set of employment policies provides many benefits for your nonprofit. For nonprofit employers, policies capture the values you wish to instill in your workforce, outline the standards of behavior you expect, and provide a clear guide for rights and responsibilities.

Instituting strong, fair, and unambiguous policies not only contributes to a happier workforce it can also improve employee retention. Further, employment law is vast, complicated, and can be tricky to navigate. Well-drafted employment policies can also help you avoid legal issues and costly mistakes.

Employee Handbook

Employee handbooks are not required by law, but having one is in the best interest of your nonprofit and those who work for you— even if you have just one employee! A good employee handbook effectively communicates the nonprofit’s policies and procedures and makes clear the rights and responsibilities of employees in your organization. Many disputes can be avoided by a clear, easy-to-read, and straightforward employee handbook.

Employment Agreement

Not to be confused with the handbook, an employment agreement sets the conditions, terms, and obligations between you as the employer and an employee. Employment agreements often include details regarding salary, benefits, paid time off, work schedule, mandatory mediation/arbitration, and defining the at-will employment relationship. Employment agreements need to be individualized to suit each employment relationship. It is considered a binding contract that should be administered in writing and signed by both employer and employee.

Formal Performance Review

Formal performance reviews are an assessment of an employee by a supervisor and the employee themselves. It’s a two-way, not a one-way discussion! The review should be based on jointly pre-determined goals and performance objectives. While often overlooked (and sometimes dreaded), performance reviews are of great value to nonprofit employers and their employees.

three people at table talking over computers

You should have in place a standardized form and consistent processes for conducting individual performance reviews of all employees. Evaluating the quality of an individual’s work, ability to meet goals, communication skills, adherence to your nonprofit’s mission, attendance, and dependability, among other criteria, is key to effective workforce management and to building trust with employees. You may also consider whether performance reviews for board members would be advantageous to the organization.

Employee Personnel File

A personnel file is a hard copy folder and/or digital file that contains information related to every new, existing, and former employee. Knowing what needs to be stored (and what should not) in a secure personnel file will help your nonprofit in promotion and termination decisions; provide a means of tracking vacations, training, and achievements; and is necessary to comply with regulations.

A personnel file should only contain items related to his or her job or employment status. These include, but are not limited to:

  • Application and resume
  • Signed acknowledgment page from the employee handbook
  • Pay information including time sheets, W-4s, and withholding forms

Just as important as having the right information in a personnel file, is to avoid placing the wrong documents in a personnel file. Some items that should not be in an employee’s personnel file include:

  • Medical information and accommodation requests
  • Whistleblower complaints
  • Court orders, such as garnishment or restraining orders

Independent Contractor Agreement

Self-employed, freelancer, consultant…people who provide goods or services to your nonprofit, but are not your employees, are considered independent contractors. Independent contractors differ from employees in that they control their financial and work-related relationships and pay their own self-employment, Social Security, and Medicare taxes.

When you hire an independent contractor, you should have a written and signed contract that clearly outlines the scope of work, rate/payment, severability, deliverables, and clearly identifies the person as an independent contractor. Also, you can minimize and avoid legal liability by placing the right provisions in an independent contractor agreement.

three employees talking at cafe table

Updating Employment Policies & Additional Policies You Need

If you already have some (or even all) of the above-listed employment policies in place, when were they last updated? Think about the many ways your organization has changed since they were written, including new employees you hired and existing employees whose roles have evolved.

Changes to state and federal laws may have rendered some elements of your employment policies incomplete or out of compliance. It may be high time to renew your commitment to a productive, happy workplace by revising employment policies.

Also, be aware this memo discusses only employment policies. To work toward optimal IRS compliance, you should adopt the nine key policies and procedures which appear on IRS Form 990. Also, you should consider having documents in place relating to the organization’s ethics, grantors and grantees, endowment management, and legal training for board directors.

To discuss further, please don’t hesitate to contact me via email (gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com) or on my cell phone (515-371-6077). I’d be happy to speak more to the particulars of employment policies, with you at your convenience.

Have you read GFLF’s latest contribution to the Iowa Bar‘s monthly publication, The Iowa Lawyer? The piece, “IRS Form 990: 10 Policies and Procedures Most Iowa Nonprofits Need” covers:

  • how important the annual information filing (Form 990) is for tax-exempt organizations;
  • top policies and procedures highlighted on the form
  • why investing in sound policies and procedures means investing in success
  • deadlines and failure to file for Form 990

While targeted toward the attorneys who subscribe to the magazine, this article provides excellent information for all nonprofit board members, officers, staff, donors, volunteers, and other stake holders. Give the article a read and then get a jump start on top notch compliance well in advance of next year’s due date for the Form 990!

If your nonprofit hasn’t yet adopted all of policies outlined in the article (or they are in dire need of an update), what are you waiting for? Contact Gordon about the 10 for 990 deal (10 essential policies asked about of Form 990) for just $990. The rate includes a consultation, documents drafted to fit the unique needs of your organization, and one full review round. The benefits are numerous and the compliance risk is frankly too great to NOT have these important policies and procedures in place.

#SelectionSunday

As we basketball fans get ready for #SelectionSunday, is your team on the bubble? Lots of reporting (like here and here and here) features teams that are oh-so-close to being in the NCAA Tournament, but perhaps not quite so.

Which reminds me to ask, how is your nonprofit team doing? In terms of compliance, is your favorite nonprofit safely “in” the compliance zone and ready to play to win, or are you hoping that the team can be just compliant enough to slide in?

Who do YOU cheer for?

person shooting on basketball court

When I say favorite nonprofit, think of it like the team you have slated to go all the way and win the final round! Perhaps your fave nonprofit is arts-oriented, like Revival Theatre Company in Cedar Rapids. Maybe your top pick is a local human services organization, like The Crisis Center in Johnson County. You could cheer the most for an animal welfare organization, like Friends of the Animal Center Foundation in Iowa City. You may be a tried and true support for a nonprofit that works for the benefit of developing countries, like Self-Help International based in Waverly, Iowa.

In any case, the nonprofit topping your list will likely need to submit an annual filing with the IRS to be “in” the compliance zone. The majority of nonprofit organizations must file some version of IRS Form 990, which asks about a number of policies and procedures.

Go for the win!

Just like the game of basketball is played within an established set of rules, tax-exempt organizations must also “play” within specific guidelines. Doing so means having specific policies and procedures in place to be compliant and in order to meet the IRS’ expectations. When a nonprofit invests in comprehensive internal and external policies and procedures it’s like investing in the right training and resources to maximize the sport team’s strengths.

To continue the analogy, consider me the coach for these policies and procedures and I want to help all Iowa nonprofits teams play their best. This is why I’m offering the 10 for 990 nonprofit policy special now through March 15. Leave the legal drafting to someone else while you continue to maximize your mission. Note that the $990 rate for the 10 important policies asked about on Form 990 also includes a comprehensive consultation and one full review round.

Help your team!

If you’re a nonprofit founder, executive, board member, or even an active volunteer, this is an excellent way to ensure the organization you’re deeply invested in is meeting (and exceeding!) the standard for tax-exempt organizations.

The 10 policies a part of this promotion will save your tax-exempt organization time, resources, and you can feel good about having a set of high quality policies to guide internal operations, present to the public (if appropriate), and fulfill Form 990 requirements.

Don’t wait for a last second shot!

As the game changes your team needs to adapt. If you already have some (or all) of the policies your team needs in place, seriously consider the last time they were updated. How has the organization changed since they were written? Have changes to state and federal laws impacted these policies at all? It may be high time for a new set of policies that fits your organization.

After you’re done filling out your March Madness bracket, commit to helping your own nonprofit team be a champion. Contact GFLF before the policy promotion is up (March 15) via email (Gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com) or by phone (515-371-6077) to get started.

shaking hands across table

In the age of the Internet there’s a free template, instructional, and how-to video for just about everything under the sun. And, for many things, from great recipes, to exercise guides, to Ikea furniture blueprints (why is there always one extra piece left over?!), this is fantastic. Sometimes it’s even hard to remember what life was like before we had access to information on just about everything at our fingertips.

There are still some things that, despite being free and appearing easy to do, are better done by a trained professional. For instance, let’s say I wanted to redo my bathroom, but have extremely limited working knowledge of how to reconfigure the plumbing to make sure it’s functional within the new design of the room. I could certainly click through step-by-step instructions on Reddit or watch a smattering of YouTube videos, but I’m still not an expert. If I tried to DIY the plumbing in my new bathroom, it would certainly take me much longer than an expert and without a doubt the finished product would be of a lesser quality. There’s also a good chance I would invest all this time and energy in the project, and still mess up, and end up having to hire a professional contractor to fix my mistakes.

Some things are just better left to the professionals. In regard to your nonprofit’s policies and procedures, this is where an experienced attorney comes in.

As a nonprofit leader, you’ve specialized in a multitude of different aspects while working toward achieving your organization’s mission. But, when it comes the super important policies and procedures, you need to have in place for top of the line legal compliance, it’s best to outsource to a legal expert. You could try the DIY way by finding free templates online and trying to muddle through the process. But, if legal issues arise and your policies are called into question you’re then going to have to call in the specialized professional to help keep the bathroom from flooding (metaphorical reference to my hypothetical plumbing mishap). If written poorly, policies could provide little to no guidance because they were too vague, not applicable to your organization, or contrasting with federal/state/local laws. An attorney can help you put all the pieces of the compliance puzzle together into an image that’s valuable.

puzzle pieces

Avoid the time, energy, and monetary costs of DIY, and opt for quality policies and procedures that are written specifically for your nonprofit by an experienced attorney in nonprofit law. Need a little more information to convince the board, the boss, or yourself? Here are three practical reasons why you should work with a professional to draft your tax-exempt organization’s policies and procedures:

Save Time

Time is a common thread amongst the majority of nonprofits I’m lucky enough to work with. There’s never enough time. When it comes to initiatives like writing a full set of beneficial policies and procedures unique to your organization, it costs time! And that is time away from all the other change-making that could be happening. Without a doubt, most nonprofits are also short on administrative help. When you hire an attorney well-versed in nonprofit law it’s a double win when it comes to time—your time isn’t wasted or misused and you get to reap the benefits of a subject matter expert’s time.

https://www.gordonfischerlawfirm.com/nonprofits-form-990-due-date/

Save Money

My 10 for 990 special for nonprofits includes 10 policies asked about of Form 990 for a flat rate of $990. Sure, it’s an investment. But, less than $1,000 is worthwhile in exchange for policies that limit potential abuse, protect against vulnerabilities, and prevent activities that go beyond permitted nonprofit activities. Adopting internal and external policies can only help in the case that your tax-exempt organization is ever audited by the IRS.

Receive Dedicated Attention & Advice

Just like I tell my estate planning clients, there is no one-size-fits-all when it comes to the important documents that will be the blueprint to your legacy. The same goes for nonprofits.

Each nonprofit is unique and accordingly your internal and external guidelines will want to reflect this. For instance, a non-operating private foundation will likely need a different set of documents than a public charity. With a dedicated nonprofit attorney working on your policies, you get unparalleled and individualized service. This type of dedicated service and attention to detail will further save you from wasting resources on forms and other legal documents that aren’t useful or beneficial to the organization. Ultimately, working with a nonprofit attorney will mean counsel that sets your nonprofit up for success, unhampered by compliance issues.

The benefits of investing in a qualified attorney to craft your important policies are numerous; the right attorney will put your organization’s best interests first, saving you resources in the long run.

Given my experience, mission, and passion for helping Iowa nonprofits, I would love the chance to fill the role of topical expert for your organization. Learn more about the 10 For 990 policy special and don’t hesitate to contact me via email (Gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com) or on my cell (515-371-6077).