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Substantiation requirements of charitable gifts made by payroll deduction

You may deduct from your federal income tax any charitable contributions of money or property made to qualified organizations if you itemize your deductions. But there are record keeping requirements.

Payroll deduction substantiation

For charitable contributions made via payroll deductions, the donor needs two documents to substantiate the gift:

  1. a pay stub, W-2, or other document furnished by the employer that sets forth the amount withheld from the taxpayer during a taxable year by the employer for the purpose of contributing to a charity;
  2. a pledge card or other document prepared by or at the direction of the charity that shows the name of the charity.

Donors who give to local United Ways or other organizations that funnel contributions to other charities need to only obtain the pledge card or other document from the United Way and not from the affiliated charities which ultimately receive the money.

Payroll deductions of $250 or more

Tax law requires that for any contribution of $250 or more, the taxpayer must substantiate the contribution by a contemporaneous written acknowledgement of the contribution by the charity. For payroll deductions, the contribution amount withheld from each payment of wages to a taxpayer is treated as a separate contribution for purposes of the $250 threshold.

So, for example, a taxpayer who gave $300 over the course of a year through payroll deductions, $30 per paycheck over ten paychecks, would not trigger the $250 substantiation requirement. The substantiation requirement would only kick in if $250 or more is withheld from each paycheck.

Gordon Fischer Law Firm, P.C. is dedicated to promoting and maximizing charitable giving in Iowa. Gordon can be reached by phone at 515-371-6077; by email at gordon@gordonfischerlawfirm.com; and through his website at www.gordonfischerlawfirm.com.

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