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Giving to your Church’s Collection Plate? Substantiation of Gifts of Cash Less Than $250

I worry about all the folks going to church this morning. (I use “church” as a term that could be easily replaced with other houses of worship: synagogue, mosque, etc.) Here’s my specific concern: when the collection plate comes around, do folks give cash? Probably. And if so, are they documenting their charitable gift? Probably not. For most people, it’s a $20 here and a $10 there, but over the course of many Sundays that can add up quickly. The total figure of such donations to a tax-exempt organization, like your church, could be claimed as a federal income tax charitable deduction. But, without substantiation, you cannot claim the beneficial charitable deduction.

The IRS requires you to have records and documents backing up your claims of charitable donations. The greater the amount of the deduction you seek, the more records that are required. Let’s start with a basic category: gifts of cash less than $250.

Substantiation requirements for monetary gifts less than $250

wallet with cash money on top

A federal income tax deduction for a charitable contribution in the form of cash, check, or other monetary gift is not allowed unless the donor substantiates the deduction with a bank record or a written communication from the donee showing the name of the donee, the date of the contribution, and the amount of the contribution.

Meaning of “monetary gift”

For this purpose, the term “monetary gift” includes, of course, gifts of cash or by check. But monetary gift also includes gifts by use of:

  • credit card;
  • electronic fund transfer;
  • online payment service;
  • payroll deduction; or
  • transfer of a gift card redeemable for cash.

Meaning of “bank record”

Again, to claim the charitable deduction for any monetary gift, you need a bank record or written communication from the donee. The term “bank record” includes a statement from a financial institution, an electronic fund transfer receipt, a cancelled check, a scanned image of both sides of a cancelled check obtained from a bank website, or a credit card statement.

Meaning of “written communication”

The term “written communication” includes email. Presumably it also includes text messages. But, again, the written communication, whether paper or electronic, it must show the name of the donee, the date of the contribution, and the amount of the contribution.

I must repeat. A federal income tax deduction for a charitable contribution in the form of cash, check, or other monetary gift is not allowed unless the donor substantiates the deduction with a bank record or a written communication from the donee showing the name of the donee, the date of the contribution, and the amount of the contribution.

How about monetary gifts [as defined above] which are $250 or more? As to cash contributions of at least $250, an extra set of substantiation rules apply. Click here to read more.

pulling dollar out of wallet

Responsibility lies with the donor

Interestingly, the responsibility for obtaining this documentation lies with the donor. The donee (the charity) is not required to record or report this information to the IRS on behalf of the donor.

If this sounds like a lot, know you don’t have to navigate these requirements just by yourself. Contact me at any time to discuss your situation and charitable giving goals. We’ll figure out the best course of action together.

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